What is an example of personification in "Mirror" by Sylvia Plath?

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In the first stanza of Sylvia Plath's "Mirror," the mirror is given a voice as the first-person narrator of the poem. This is the first way in which Plath personifies the mirror.

The mirror also describes itself in human terms. It is "not cruel, only truthful," "meditate[s] on the opposite wall," and "think[s]" that the opposite wall is "a part of [its] heart." At the end of the stanza, the mirror (as the narrator) seems rather sad, separated as it is from the opposite wall by "Faces and darkness . . . over and over."

In the second stanza, the narrator metamorphoses into a lake: a different kind of mirror. The narration continues in the first-person—suggesting that the narrator has a conscious self—but, otherwise, it becomes less like a human. The lake is more passive than the mirror in the first stanza. The mirror in the first stanza had agency and could act independently; it could think and it could decide whether to be cruel or kind.

Overall, the personification of the mirror in this poem is perhaps a way for Plath to express the isolation, the separation, and—as in the second stanza—the passivity that she felt in her life. This poem was published in 1961, only two years before Plath's suicide.

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The entire poem "Mirror" is an extended use of personification. The poem is in first-person, with the speakers embodying the reflector concept in two different ways. The speaker in the first stanza is an actual mirror, and the one in the second stanza is a lake.

In stanza one, the mirror speaks of its (vertical) position hanging on the wall, silver and four-cornered. It mentions its heart but also says its reaction is "unmisted by love or dislike." It refers to reflection as "swallowing."

The second stanza's speaker is a lake, a different kind of mirror, in horizontal position as a "woman bends over" it. This lake reflects "faithfully," in contrast to light from candles, which are "liars." Rather than say that the woman is aging, the mirror says she has "drowned" a girl in it. The old woman she has become rises out of the lake like a fish.

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