What is an example of hyperbole in "All Summer in a Day"?

There is hyperbole in the title of "All Summer in a Day," as well as in the descriptions of how heavy the rain is and how long life has remained the same.

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First things first: what is hyperbole? This word refers to exaggerated statements or claims that are not meant to be taken literally. Rather, they are a useful device in the creation of a story or the description of a character.

In this particular story, the incessant rain is the...

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First things first: what is hyperbole? This word refers to exaggerated statements or claims that are not meant to be taken literally. Rather, they are a useful device in the creation of a story or the description of a character.

In this particular story, the incessant rain is the best example of hyperbole. Venus is described as a place in which it rains all year long, except for one hour every seven years in which the sun comes out. A basic understanding of biology tells us that it it highly improbably that any life-sustaining ecosystem could survive these conditions.

In addition, the way that our protagonist, Margot, is described is tainted by hyperbole. She is described in a metaphor as "an old photograph dusted from an album," which makes it sound as though she is about to crumble away into nothingness. While this cannot be true in a practical sense, it is an apt description of a girl pining for the sun, and for her old life on earth.

Later, her face is described as being "pale snow". Again, while this literary device is used to create an image of extreme paleness, no human face can ever be as white as snow. Hyperbole has been used to describe the effect that a world of constant rain has on a child's complexion.

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A further example of hyperbole in "All Summer in a Day" comes in the following description of Margot:

She was a frail girl who looked as if she had been lost in the rain for years, and the rain had washed out the blue from her eyes and the red from her mouth and the yellow from her hair.

This is an example of hyperbole because the author is exaggerating for effect. Margot's eyes, mouth, and hair have not had their color washed out by the rain; it just appears that they have.

Bradbury uses hyperbole on this particular occasion to highlight just how difficult Margot is finding it to adapt to life on the planet Venus, where it rains practically all the time. The hyperbole is so vivid, so wonderfully drawn, that it's possible to envisage Margot as being quite pale and colorless as a result of all the rain she's had to endure since she moved from Earth to Venus.

As someone with first-hand experience of what sunshine is like, Margot feels the constant rainfall more acutely than everyone else. That is why it's entirely appropriate for Bradbury to use hyperbole in showing us just how much this poor unfortunate young girl suffers on this rain-drenched planet. It's as if all the color in her life, the life that she experienced back on Earth, has been washed away. In that respect, her outward appearance is a reflection of what's going on in her soul.

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The title of Ray Bradbury's "All Summer in a Day" is hyperbole. The rain stops and the sun comes out, so the brief interlude described in the story is the closest thing the children on Venus will experience to summer. However, it has nothing of the variety of summer days in colder climates or the long, languid consistency of summer days, weeks, and months in the tropics. It also, paradoxically, excludes the experience of summer rain showers and the monsoon.

The rain is also described hyperbolically. Bradbury says that the storms were "so heavy they were tidal waves come over the islands," a situation which sounds impossible to survive if it were literally true. The author then adds,

A thousand forests had been crushed under the rain and grown up a thousand times to be crushed again.

This may or may not be literally true, but the pioneers on Venus have certainly not been there long enough to know. Unless a paleobotanist has studied the situation, which is not indicated, the remark is likely to be hyperbole. The next observation, however, is certainly hyperbole:

And this was the way life was forever on the planet Venus.

The hyperbole in these descriptions of torrential rain crushing forests and the length of time for which everything has been the same emphasizes the perspective of the children, for whom it really does seem to have been raining forever, since they have never experienced anything else.

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Hyperbole is used for descriptions of the rain stopping and the jungle growing.

Hyperbole is extreme exaggeration. Authors use it to describe situations that are intense, as a way to help the reader fully gauge the extremity of them. Bradbury uses hyperbole and other literary devices throughout this story to help the reader fully appreciate the situation on Venus, where it never stops raining.

This story is about a group of children who do not remember seeing the sun. They live on Venus, where it rains almost constantly. The sun came out once when they were two years old, but they do not remember it. Now the sun is supposed to come out again, and the children are very excited.

One child, Margot, has been to Earth more recently than the others. She remembers the sun, and suffers more from the constant rain on Venus than most. To help us appreciate the situation, Bradbury uses hyperbole to describe the way everyone feels when the constant rain stops.

The silence was so immense and unbelievable that you felt your ears had been stuffed or you had lost your hearing altogether.

In other words, the lack of rain is deafening, because the people of Venus are so used to hearing rain that the lack of rain comes as a shock to their ears.

The description of the jungle is also an example of hyperbole. 

They stopped running and stood in the great jungle that covered Venus, that grew and never stopped growing, tumultuously, even as you watched it.

You can’t literally see the jungle growing, but it rains so much and the jungle grows so fast that it seems this way. This adds to the helplessness that the children, especially Margot, are feeling. It seems as if the rain will never end and it will just swallow them up.

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