What is an analysis of the poem "Da Same, Da Same" by Sipho Sepamla?

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Sipho Sepamla is a South African poet born in 1932. He wrote during Apartheid and had some of his work banned by the Apartheid regime. Apartheid was a strict and violently enforced system of racial segregation in South Africa that was enforced by the Dutch Empire and lasted from 1948...

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Sipho Sepamla is a South African poet born in 1932. He wrote during Apartheid and had some of his work banned by the Apartheid regime. Apartheid was a strict and violently enforced system of racial segregation in South Africa that was enforced by the Dutch Empire and lasted from 1948 to 1990, though informal policies of segregation long preceded these dates.

The poem "Da Same" is a reflection on the ways that the brutal segregation of this regime can only be understood as disgusting and absurd. The poem repeatedly emphasizes the sameness of humans in the face of policies that claim to enforce differences. The poem has a pleading but also mildly threatening tone. While the body of the poem is mostly repetitions on the theme of sameness, the closing repetition is a reminder that we all bleed the same. The final line tells white South Africans that they should be ashamed to look in the eyes of black South Africans until they correct these wrongs.

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