What is a summary of the novel Good-bye, Mr. Chips?

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The novel opens as Mr. Chipping, known as Mr. Chips, sits by his fire at age 85. He lives in Mrs. Wickett's house, and she watches him as he sleeps. He is a retired teacher from the Brookfield School in England, which is across the street from where he now...

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The novel opens as Mr. Chipping, known as Mr. Chips, sits by his fire at age 85. He lives in Mrs. Wickett's house, and she watches him as he sleeps. He is a retired teacher from the Brookfield School in England, which is across the street from where he now lives.

As he sits by Mrs. Wickett's fire, he recalls earlier episodes in his life, including when he was hired at the school in 1870 by a headmaster named Wetherby. Not a good disciplinarian, Mr. Chips was menaced as a young teacher of Greek and Latin by a student named Colley. He made the boy write 100 lines, and the boy did not bother him afterward and went on to be an alderman in London. Mr. Chips later taught Colley's son and grandson.

Though Chips had ambitions to be a headmaster, he realized that he was better as a teacher. In middle age, he married a young woman named Katherine Bridges, who later died giving birth to his child, who also died. She nonetheless inspired him with her vivacious spirit, and he began to become endeared to the boys he taught as he showed a greater sense of humor. He briefly became acting head of the school and had a number of his students fight in World War I. When he retired, he moved across the street from the school but returned to teach during World War II. He recalls many of his students, and their names come to him as he dies.

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James Hilton's novel, Good-bye Mr. Chips, is a sentimental tale about a popular schoolteacher at Brookfield, an English boys school. Nearly the entire story takes place in the form of a reminiscence as old Mr. Chips sits happily in his rocking chair before a roaring fire one November night. A popular teacher, Mr. Chips became the most beloved figure at the school, eventually ascending to headmaster. He was known for his excellent memory for faces and for his way of turning a joke. His students, many who became leading politicians, loved him for his good humor and his kindness. As he sat by the fire, he thought about his wife, who had died many years before, and about the bombs the Germans rained upon the town during World War I. Mr. Chips, now 85 years old and retired, had been at Brookfield for nearly half a century before his retirement; now, as he remembered so fondly the good times he had enjoyed, there was a knock on his door. It was a young student who, he claimed, had been told that Mr. Chips had sent for him. Mr. Chips recognized it as a longtime prank the Brookfield boys had often played, but rather than embarrass the boy, he told him to sit and have tea. Afterward, the boy waved goodbye. He would later proudly tell his friends that he was the last person to say goodbye to Mr. Chips, for the old headmaster and teacher died peacefully in his sleep shortly after the boy left.  

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