What is a summary of chapter 1 in To Sir, With Love?

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In chapter 1, Mr. Braithwaite is seated in a red double-decker bus making its way through Aldgate. The bus is crowded, and he notes that most of the passengers are charwomen.

Mr. Braithwaite notices that the buxom, robust women enjoy trading ribald jokes with each other. They pay him little...

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In chapter 1, Mr. Braithwaite is seated in a red double-decker bus making its way through Aldgate. The bus is crowded, and he notes that most of the passengers are charwomen.

Mr. Braithwaite notices that the buxom, robust women enjoy trading ribald jokes with each other. They pay him little mind, the only male (and black) passenger on the bus.

The woman next to him, Rose, engages in loud conversation with Gert, the woman across from her. Rose hints that she wouldn't mind having Mr. Braithwaite in her bed. However, Gert maintains that Rose has been a widow too long to enjoy the experience. For her part, Rose retorts that one never forgets bed play; it's like riding a bicycle. Meanwhile, Gert good-naturedly tells Rose that she'll send her husband Alfie to her on "one of these nights."

Mr. Braithwaite finds himself marveling at the openness of the women. They, in turn, are surprised that he has understood every word they have spoken.

Soon, Rose gets off the bus at her stop. A well-dressed woman and a little boy board the bus. However, the woman makes no move to take the seat beside Mr. Braithwaite. It is the only empty seat on the bus.

The conductor of the bus soon orders the woman to sit down. However, she makes no move to do so. Meanwhile, the charwomen show obvious irritation at the airs put on by the well-dressed woman. Yet, despite the woman's attitude of superiority, Mr. Braithwaite finds himself marveling at her composed defiance.

The silent battle between the new passenger and the conductor is never resolved, however, for Mr. Braithwaite gets off at the next stop. Upon disembarking, he becomes suddenly depressed. London's East End is actually filthy: the streets are littered with organic refuse, there is rubble everywhere, and many buildings display obvious bomb-ravaged conditions.

Mr. Braithwaite continues walking until he locates a narrow alleyway with the sign "Greenslade Secondary School."

A young boy soon directs him to Mr. Florian's office. The latter is the principal of the school. Mr. Florian welcomes Mr. Braithwaite and advises him to take a look around the school. The principal confesses that his school does not follow the conventions teachers are accustomed to. Therefore, it would be wise for Mr. Braithwaite to see what he is up against before making the decision to stay on.

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The story opens with Mr. Richard Braithwaite riding a crowded red double-decker bus in London. He is squashed in his seat by a large, ribald lady named Rose, who engages in good-natured repartee with the other charwomen on the bus. Mr. Braithwaite, the only male on the bus besides the conductor, is amused by their banter, smiling inwardly at "the essential naturalness of these folk who were an integral part of one of the world's greatest cities." When the bus reaches Commercial Road, Rose gets off the bus, at a stop where a "slim, smartly dressed woman" gets on with a little boy. The only empty seat is the one next to Mr. Braithwaite, but the woman, who is obviously of an upper class, will not take the seat because Mr. Braithwaite is black. The conductor tells the woman that there is no standing allowed on the bus, but the woman still refuses to sit by Mr. Braithwaite. At this point, Mr. Braithwaite realizes that he has reached his destination and disembarks, thus defusing the situation.

The neighborhood in which Mr. Braithwaite finds himself is noisy and littered. There is rubble everywhere from the bombings which occurred during the recent war, as well as rubbish and a variety of unpleasant smells. Mr. Braithwaite walks down the streets, feeling "sick and dirtied," and finally reaches an alleyway where there is a sign with the legend, "GREENSLADE SECONDARY SCHOOL." When Mr. Braithwaite enters the shabby grounds of the institution, he is met by "a small, dark-haired, elfin-faced boy...dressed in blue jeans and a discolored once-white T-shirt," who directs him to the headmaster, Mr. Florian. Mr. Florian has been expecting Mr. Braithwaite, and invites him to look around the school. According to Mr. Florian, "things are done (there) somewhat differently from the usual run," and the headmaster hopes that Mr. Braithwaite will like what he sees and decide to stay (Chapter 1).

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