What is a summary for chapter 1 of Lyddie?

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The first chapter of Lyddie opens with an ominous use of foreshadowing . The narrator starts by telling the reader that "The bear had been their undoing. Though at the time they had all laughed." This sets up the chapter and the rest of the book by letting the reader...

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The first chapter of Lyddie opens with an ominous use of foreshadowing. The narrator starts by telling the reader that "The bear had been their undoing. Though at the time they had all laughed." This sets up the chapter and the rest of the book by letting the reader know that bad things are about to happen to the unsuspecting characters. We are then introduced to Lyddie and her young siblings, Charles, Rachel, and Agnes. We are also told that the year is 1843.

While Lyddie is preparing a pot of oatmeal, a large bear comes into their home. Lyddie gets her siblings and her mom up into the loft for safety. The hungry bear comes in and tries some of the oatmeal, but it is too hot, and the bear leaves after trashing the house.

We also learn a lot about the family dynamics in this chapter. Lyddie seems to be a clear leader. She takes control of the situation as soon as she spots the bear. It is she who directs the rest of the family to keep them safe. We can see that the mother is not the type to take action. She is the most scared during this situation and, in fact, has to be shushed along with the younger girls by Lyddie when they cry out in fear. It is Lyddie who has to comfort her mother during this episode.

Lyddie's mother is apparently a very superstitious woman and takes this as a sign that the end of times is near. Their mother decides to leave the house and takes her youngest daughters with her. Charles and Lyddie stay behind. We learn that their father had left several years ago. While the children hold out hope that he will return, their mother thinks he is gone for good. It was apparently his departure that led to her mental decline.

Charles and Lyddie stay on the farm through the winter. It is tough times for them, but they are resourceful enough to make it through. That spring, they receive a letter from their mother. It informs them that Lyddie has been hired out to work at the Cutler Tavern and Charles is to be sent to work at the mill. Their mother has sold off the farm to repay a debt. The children are devastated to hear this. However, they do end the chapter laughing at their mother's poor spelling in the letter.

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Chapter 1 begins with a harrowing situation for Lyddie and her family. Readers meet Lyddie while she is stirring a pot of oatmeal over the fire. Unfortunately, her brother, Charlie, left the door to the house open, and a bear enters the cabin. Lyddie immediately takes action, and she is able to get everybody up into the loft area for some modicum of protection against the bear. The bear rummages around for a bit, and it makes its way over to the boiling pot of oatmeal. It tries to eat the oatmeal, but it is burned in the process and leaves the house.

Most of the family laughs at what they just went through as a way of working out the stress and tension, but Lyddie's mother doesn't think it is any laughing matter. She thinks that the bear signals the beginning of the end times, so she tells her family that they are going to leave the next day. Lyddie's mother wants to be "with the faithful when the end comes."

Charlie and Lyddie refuse to leave. They want to tend to the house through the winter. Part of Lyddie still believes that their dad is going to come home, and they don't want their father coming home to an empty, run-down house. Lyddie and Charlie do an amazing job, and they even are blessed with the birth of a calf.

The calf was born to great rejoicing and a new abundance of milk and cream. Lyddie and Charles felt rich as townsfolk.

Spring eventually arrives, and Lyddie and Charlie receive a letter from their mom. The news is not good. Lyddie has been hired out to work at Cutler's Tavern, and Charlie is to work at a mill. The family's farm land is also to be lent out in an effort to pay back family debts. Needless to say, both Charlie and Lyddie are extremely disappointed.

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The first chapter of the novel Lyddie begins with a bear in the Worthen cabin. The bear pushes its head through the door that Charlie left ajar. Lyddie tells the rest of the family to move quickly and smoothly up into the loft. She remains below on the main floor, keeping her eyes fiercely locked with the eyes of the bear as it pokes its head through the doorway. Lyddie backs up toward the ladder and climbs it herself.

Only then does the bear come fully into the cabin. It pokes around curiously and ends up sticking its nose into a kettle of porridge bubbling over the fire. The kettle gets stuck on the bear's head, and it staggers around the cabin and then out the door. Lyddie and her siblings burst out laughing, but Mrs. Worthen takes the event as a sign that the end of the world is upon them. She decides it is time to go live with her sister to await the end. Lyddie tries to dissuade her mother, but she says that if they don't leave the farm now, they will find themselves at the poor farm.

The children's father has been away for two years, and they have no idea whether he will return. Lyddie tells her mother that she and Charlie will stay at the farm waiting for their father's return. Charlie takes his mother and the two little girls to Uncle Judah's farm and returns after two weeks. Lyddie and Charlie manage to survive through the winter in the cabin by eating rabbits and soup made from peeled bark. When the cow births its calf, they enjoy cream and milk again. One day in the spring the shopkeeper's wife from the village general store brings the children a letter from their mother. She has hired them out to the mill and the tavern to pay the family debts, and she has sold the cow and horse and let out the land to Mr. Wescott. Lyddie cries upon reading the letter. Charlie tries to cheer her up by making a joke about their mother's wish for the end of the world and her poor spelling. Charlie and Lyddie laugh together, but Lyddie is still heartbroken at having to leave Charlie and their farm. 

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