What is a short summary of Steinbeck's Of Mice And Men?

Of Mice and Men is a story about two farm workers, George and Lennie, who find work during the Great Depression. At the end of the story one of these friends kills the other to protect the other from being killed by a lynch mob. The story is also about universal themes like friendship, sacrifice, loneliness, persecution, and alienation.

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John Steinbeck's novella Of Mice and Men chronicles the brief experiences of two migrant workers, George and Lennie , on a ranch in Soledad, California during the 1930s. Both George and Lennie are close friends, who travel throughout the United States looking for work on farms. George is portrayed...

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John Steinbeck's novella Of Mice and Men chronicles the brief experiences of two migrant workers, George and Lennie, on a ranch in Soledad, California during the 1930s. Both George and Lennie are close friends, who travel throughout the United States looking for work on farms. George is portrayed as an intense, intelligent man, who takes care of his mentally disabled friend, Lennie. Shortly after they arrive at the ranch, they are confronted by the boss's aggressive son, who immediately intimidates Lennie and poses a threat to both men. Steinbeck then introduces the characters of Candy, Carlson, Crooks, and Slim, who all work on the ranch. Slim is depicted as the wisest man on the farm and ends up giving Lennie one of his puppies.

The men on the ranch spend the majority of their time working and daydreaming about owning their own property. Curley's lonely wife begins to flirt with the men, and George warns Lennie to stay away from her. Lennie then accidentally kills the puppy Slim gave him, and Curley's wife consoles him by allowing Lennie to pet her hair while they are alone in the barn. Curley's wife ends up panicking while Lennie is petting her hair, and he accidentally breaks her neck when she struggles to get away. Lennie then remembers George's advice and runs to the tranquil spot by the Salinas River. When George discovers that Lennie killed Curley's wife, he steals Carlson's pistol and meets up with Lennie at their designated spot by the river. As Curley's lynch mob closes in on them, George shoots Lennie in the back of the head before Curley's men can torture him.

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Of Mice and Men is a short novel set during the Great Depression (1930s). The story follows two main characters, Lennie Small and George Milton, as they travel from job to job as itinerant ranchers. It is a physically difficult job and tends to require workers to continually travel from one job to the next. So, George and Lennie are wanderers, looking for a stable place to settle down. The story begins in the Salinas River Valley (California). George has taken it upon himself to look after his unnaturally strong but mentally challenged friend Lennie. George is smart and direct. His quickness of mind and small features are in sharp contrast to Lennie who is large, shy, and socially awkward.

The first man was small and quick, dark of face, with restless eyes and sharp, strong features. Every part of him was defined: small, strong hands, slender arms, a thin and bony nose. Behind him walked his opposite, a huge man, shapeless of face, with large, pale eyes, and wide, sloping shoulders; and he walked heavily, dragging his feet a little, the way a bear drags his paws. 

At the beginning of the story, George and Lennie have just run from a job because Lennie tried to pet a girl's dress and held on too tight after becoming agitated. Lennie's physical strength is useful for the ranching jobs he and George are employed in but it gets him into trouble. Lennie has the mind of child. He likes to pet soft things: mice, rabbits, and dresses. Not understanding his own strength, he can crush a mouse in his hands and also has the tendency to become violent when he finds himself in uncomfortable social situations. Lennie is innocent at heart but the combination of his simplistic mind and brute strength make him dangerous. It is all George can do to watch him like a hawk so such situations never occur. 

The end goal for George and Lennie is to have their own farm: more chance to make a profit and a more stable lifestyle, less chance for Lennie to get into trouble. George is constantly on Lennie's case to behave himself and if possible not to talk to others. He does so not out of spite but to make sure Lennie doesn't get into any more trouble. However, George knows that life without Lennie would be easier on himself. Still, George perseveres and does his best to look after Lennie while pursuing the dream of owning their own farm. At the new job, Lennie has trouble fitting in. In the end, he gets into trouble as he always does and George is faced with a difficult decision of ending the cycle or of continuing to try and manage Lennie's and his lives together. Among other themes, this story is about friendship and the pursuit of an elusive dream during the Great Depression. 

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John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, written in 1937, deals with the experiences of two best friends, George Milton and Lennie Small. After Lennie gets into trouble in the California town of Weed, the two men flee southward and work at a barley farm near Soledad, California. During their stay on the farm, Lennie, who is physically very strong but mentally challenged, accidentally kills the wife of Curley, the son of the farm's boss.

George knows that Curley and the other men on the farm will kill Lennie, so George secretly takes one of the other men's guns and finds Lennie near the Salinas River, where they had initially stopped before going on to the farm. George and Lennie sit together and George tells Lennie about their dream farm, just as he has many times before. While Lennie listens, George takes the gun and shoots Lennie in the back of the head:

George raised the gun and steadied it, and he brought the muzzle of it close to the back of Lennie’s head. The hand shook violently, but his face set and his hand steadied. He pulled the trigger. The crash of the shot rolled up the hills and rolled down again. Lennie jarred, and then settled slowly forward to the sand, and he lay without quivering.

The novel ends with another of the farm workers telling George that he had to kill Lennie.

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Of Mice and Men tells the story of two men, George and Lennie, who dream of one day owning their own piece of land. George and Lennie are representative of itinerant workers during the Great Depression of the 1930s. They struggle to find and to keep work, and they have few prospects. At the beginning of the story, George and Lennie are on their way to secure employment on a ranch. Once they begin work, they are relatively happy, and they save enough money to almost be able to buy their own piece of land. However, just before they can save enough money, Lennie accidentally kills a woman on the farm. George decides to kill Lennie, rather than let Lennie be imprisoned or lynched.

Of Mice and Men is a story about friendship and sacrifice, and also about alienation, persecution, and loneliness. George and Lennie's friendship is sincere and profound. George protects Lennie as a parent might protect a child, and Lennie, in turn, will do anything he can to make sure no harm comes to George. The value of their friendship is emphasized because so many of the other characters they meet are alienated and lonely. Crooks, the black stable buck, is alienated because of the color of her skin, Curley's wife is alienated because of her sex, and Candy, the old man, is alienated because of his age. Throughout the story, Steinbeck shows how alienation and persecution can create loneliness, and often bitterness too. The moral of the story is that we should all be kinder to one another, and that loneliness is a terrible and destructive feeling.

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