What is a quote that depicts Mayella accusing Tom Robinson of rape in the novel To Kill A Mockingbird?

A quote that depicts Mayella accusing Tom Robinson of rape in To Kill a Mockingbird is "Fore I knew it he was on me. Just run up behind me, he did ... he chunked me on the floor an' choked me'n took advantage of me."

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During chapter 18, Mayella takes the stand and testifies against Tom Robinson, claiming he raped her when she invited him inside to bust up a chiffarobe. Her description of the attack is initially not terribly detailed:

... I turned around an 'fore I knew it he was on me. Just run up behind me, he did. He got me round the neck, cussin' me an' sayin' dirt—I fought 'n' hollered, but he had me round the neck. He hit me agin' an' agin'...

After a brief pause, she finishes with:

he chucked me on the floor an' choked me 'n took advantage of me.

Mayella's testimony does not hold up under scrutiny. Atticus questions Mayella about her home life, from which it is revealed that Bob Ewell is abusive to his children, and he asks her to repeat that Tom choked her and hit her face before revealing that Tom has a withered arm—making the attack as described by Mayella physically impossible, not to mention her testimony quite invalid.

Mayella's conduct during the scene is agitated. She is clearly under pressure by her father, looking to him when Atticus's questions make the ruse more difficult to uphold.

Mayella ends her testimony with an outburst:

I got somethin' to say an' then I ain't gonna say no more. That nigger yonder took advantage of me an' if you fine fancy gentlemen don't wanna do nothin' about it then you're all yellow stinkin' cowards, stikin' cowards, the lot of you.

This is meant to deflect all the evidence proving she has been lying about the rape. She is using an emotional appeal to get the jury on her side: her words evoke the idea of white men needing to protect white women from the sexual advances of black men. Though she is lower class and therefore considered "white trash" by the more privileged townspeople, her race gives her an advantage over Tom since old prejudices linger in Maycomb. She is basically claiming any refusal to convict Tom is a sign of their lack of integrity and manhood. Unfortunately, though the evidence all suggests Tom's innocence, these appeals override any reason or sense of justice in the Maycomb jury.

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From the time she takes the witness stand, Mayella Ewell is an unsteady and unbelievable witness. She takes the kind respect of Atticus as an effort to insult her and admits with a nod that when her father is drinking, things can get tough.

At one point during Mayella's testimony, Atticus asks Tom to rise and then asks Mayella if this is the man who raped her.

She replies, "It most certainly is."

This testimony is a clear fabrication, as it is clear even to Scout and Jem that Tom could could not have assaulted Mayella in the ways she has testified because of the injuries he sustained to one arm when he was a boy.

Atticus simply responds with a one-word question: "How?"

Mayella defends her testimony, saying, "I don't know how he done it, but he done it—I said it all happened so fast I—"

Try as he might, Atticus cannot get Mayella to modify her testimony to reflect the facts of the case, and she finally ends her time on the stand with a vocal outburst that is both racially inflammatory and personally insulting to Atticus. Her testimony reveals that the Ewells are entrenched in hatred and abuse, yet the all-white jury convicts Tom in spite of overwhelming evidence to attest to his innocence.

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While she is on the witness stand, Mayella Ewell relates the incidents of the day of the supposed rape. She states that she called to "Robinson," offering him a nickel if he would "bust up" a chiffarobe for her. Then, she claims that when she turned around, he assaulted her.

'Fore I knew it he was on me. Just run up behind me, he did . . . he chunked me on the floor an' choked me'n took advantage of me."

Mr. Gilmer, the prosecutor, then asks Mayella if she screamed and fought Robinson to establish that he forced himself upon her. Mayella replies, "I reckon I did . . . kicked and hollered loud as I could." Again, Mr. Gilmer asks her if she fought as hard as she could. He then inquires, "You are positive that he took full advantage of you?" Mayella twists her face and appears to be holding back a strong urge to cry. She underscores her previous claim of rape by saying, "he done what he was after."

As Atticus questions Mayella, Mayella reiterates the testimony that she gave to Mr. Gilmer, namely, that Tom Robinson choked her and then released her throat and hit her. Atticus then has Tom stand up so that the jurors and all those in the courtroom can see that Tom only has one arm which he can use. When Mayella realizes that Atticus intends to discredit her testimony by raising doubt in the minds of the jurors as to how Tom could choke her, quickly strike her, throw her down, and rape her when he has only one useful arm, Mayella's face becomes "a mixture of terror and fury." 

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In Chapter 18, Mayella Ewell takes the witness stand to testify against Tom Robinson. The prosecutor begins by asking her to repeat what happened on the night of November 21st. Mayella claims that she offered Tom Robinson a nickel to bust up an old chiffarobe, and when she went into the house to retrieve the nickel, he followed her in and began assaulting her. She says he "chunked" her on the floor and took advantage of her. When Atticus begins to question Mayella, she thinks he is mocking her because he calls her "Ma'am." After asking her a series of questions that reveal how Mayella lives a rather lonely, pitiful life, Atticus asks her if she remembers being struck in the face. Mayella confuses her testimony by first saying "no," then saying "yes." Mayella suddenly remembers that Tom choked her, then tried to punch her, and his punch glanced her eye. When Atticus asks her why no one came running when she screamed, Mayella doesn't answer. Atticus asks her a litany of follow-up questions which Mayella refuses to answer. After Atticus begs her to tell the truth, that her father beat her, Mayella says,

"I got somethin' to say an' then I ain't gonna say it no more. That nigger yonder took advantage of me an' if you fine fancy gentlemen don't wanta do nothin' about it then you're all yellow stinkin' cowards, stinkin' cowards, the lot of you." (Lee 251)

Despite Mayella's contradictory testimony that is clearly fabricated, Tom Robinson becomes a victim of racial injustice and is wrongly convicted of assaulting and raping Mayella Ewell.

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