What is a justification of the title "The Last Ride Together" by Robert Browning?

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The speaker has just been rejected by his lover. But before they part once and for all, he makes a final request: that she leave with him for one last ride. It was perfectly normal in Browning's day for lovers to ride off together side by side. But the absence...

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The speaker has just been rejected by his lover. But before they part once and for all, he makes a final request: that she leave with him for one last ride. It was perfectly normal in Browning's day for lovers to ride off together side by side. But the absence of any explicit mention of horses in the poem has led some scholars to argue that Browning is using the lovers' ride as a metaphor for sex.

In any case, Browning, here as elsewhere in his voluminous oeuvre, is showing his much importance he attaches to love—be it romantic, sexual, or whatever—by dramatizing it. This isn't just a couple of lovers hanging out together for the last time before they go their separate ways. There's something timeless and transcendent about their bond, a bond that will last forever. In that sense, the title is something of a misnomer, because whatever the state of their relationship down here on earth, the lovers will never truly be apart as their souls are joined together in eternity, their unbreakable bond metaphorized by a never-ending ride.

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In "The Last Ride Together," the speaker has just been rejected by his lover. He reluctantly accepts this outcome but asks her to go horseback riding one last time. Evidence that she agrees to this is in the second stanza when he says, "I and my mistress, side by side, / Shall be together, breathe and ride," (19-20). As they ride, the speaker contemplates on how this experience is better than the work of statesmen, poets, and sculptors. Since they have broken up, the speaker considers that this will be their last ride. But he also imagines this experience continued in heaven, thereby extending the ride forever, necessarily making the "last" ride "last" forever ("The instant made eternity,-"). 

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