What is a good thesis comparing the personal life of Charlotte Perkins Gilman to her short story "The Yellow Wallpaper"?

A good thesis that compares the personal life of author Charlotte Perkins Gilman and the narrator of her short story "The Yellow Wallpaper" could focus on the many similarities between the two women. Both Gilman and the narrator were refused the opportunity to exercise any control over their "treatments," and both experienced additional suffering rather than seeing any improvement as a result of the "cures" their doctors employed.

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In her real life, Charlotte Perkins Gilman got married in her early twenties, but she soon found that the domestic role married women were expected to embrace was unsatisfactory to her. Very early on in their relationship, she got pregnant and delivered a daughter. She then became depressed, was diagnosed...

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In her real life, Charlotte Perkins Gilman got married in her early twenties, but she soon found that the domestic role married women were expected to embrace was unsatisfactory to her. Very early on in their relationship, she got pregnant and delivered a daughter. She then became depressed, was diagnosed with "melancholia," and eventually suffered a nervous breakdown. She was given no choice or say in her treatments, and she was actually treated by Weir Mitchell, the famous doctor who is named by the narrator of "The Yellow Wallpaper." Under his care, she received electrotherapy and was ordered to stay in bed for extended periods of time and suffer the "perfect rest" that the speaker in the story must endure.

The story, with the narrator's eventual fate, does show the dangers of not taking women's illnesses seriously—as the narrator's husband/doctor John fails to do—and not giving women the opportunity to weigh in on whether or not their "treatments" are actually helping them to feel better. Therefore, a good potential thesis could focus on the many similarities between Gilman and the story's narrator: how they both developed what we might now call postpartum depression, how they both suffered more as a result of the "cures" used to treat them, and how both women's conditions actually worsened as a result of their treatments.

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