What is the irony in "The Storm" by Kate Chopin?

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Since Kate Chopin's "The Storm" is a sequel to her story entitled "At the 'Cadian Ball," it is important to consider this other narrative as contributing to what is ironic in this story. Arguably, then, it is ironic when Alcée and Calixta, who "talked low, and laughed softly, as lovers do" at the Acadian ball before they each married are again placed privately together as a raging storm brews. But, as their fears are heightened in this storm, it is not surprising that their previously unsatisfied passions resurface in their emotional states.

It is the dramatic irony of Calixta's unsuspecting husband's return as well as the irony of situation in which Calixta and Alcée both are happier with their spouses after their acts of adultery than previously (Alcée writes his wife a loving letter in which he allows her to lengthen her familial visit and Calixta excitedly delights in the shrimp that Bobinôt brings home), that stand out as strong examples of irony in "The Storm." In fact, Chopin...

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