Irony In Harrison Bergeron

What is the irony in "Harrison Bergeron" by Kurt Vonnegut?

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The irony in “Harrison Bergeron” is how the dystopian society in the story defines “equality”.  To the government and its citizens, “equality” means to make everyone the same.  We tend to see equality as guaranteeing the same rights for all people, and that includes allowing someone to be an individual.  However, the society in which George, Hazel, and Harrison live handicaps its people in order to ensure that no one is better than anyone else in anything.  If you’re smart like George, you have loud noises pumped into your ears through small ear buds that cut off all thought.  For Harrison who is young, handsome, tall, and strong, he is weighed down by 300 lbs of metal, has ear buds, and wears thick eyeglasses. 

The society does not believe in the values of equality like free speech and personal freedom.  Instead they view equality as making everyone identical with no one having unique abilities or gifts to become superior.  The irony lies in the way Vonnegut...

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