what interpration can we give for the parents teacher association?  if we made a questionnaire on parents teacher asociation. then what will be the mainly interpret on pta?

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

You can write a questionnaire to determine what parents think of the Parent Teacher Association, as certain types of parents usually join. Maybe there are some misconceptions, such as that it's an insiders' club and new people are not welcome. That can prevent new blood.
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M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

If you go to the PTA/PTO/PTSA organization website, they will show you the mission and vision of the Parent Teacher Association, and that should be the guidelines for you to use to build your questionnaire.

Take their organizational goals, and see how they apply to your school, and especially to the type of students who attend the school.

Usually schools that are in posh neigbhorhoods and do not lack a lot of money can boast a very festive and spirit-wear wearing PTA with high dollar activities to cash in even more funding.

But, if your school needs funding, then its PTA should demonstraten through its activities and plans that they are there to boost funding for student needs and extra curricular activities, that their earnings will be audited to correlate to the needs of the students, and that they represent the parents in search for the best educational opportunity for their kids.

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

This is a fairly broad question.  A questionnaire is one of many ways of reading the tea leaves of parental beliefs about their school.  The questions asked can serve as a good baseline to discuss findings, but cannot represent the sum total of all of parental beliefs.  Part of what makes this difficult is being able to read the lines between parental satisfaction and apathy.  For example, if one sends out a PTA questionnaire to all parents, some might not fill it out because they are satisfied and are content enough with things, while others might not fill it out due to apathy.  The question would be how to interpret the variances in the same action.  Of the returned questionnaires, some data could be collected, but if a small number are returned, can many substantial assertions be made from such a paltry showing?  In the final analysis, questionnaires are one of many means to ensure that an effective reading of parental satisfaction is taking place.

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