Lord of the Flies Questions and Answers
by William Golding

Lord of the Flies book cover
Start Your Free Trial

What are the internal and external conflicts of Ralph?  Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Expert Answers info

David Morrison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2017

write11,912 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Law and Politics

If there's a hero in Lord of the Flies, it's Ralph. He's the sensible, rational one, the boy who realizes that, if this party of stranded schoolboys is to survive, there needs to be some kind of rules-based order on the island. Otherwise, Ralph realizes with remarkable prescience, the boys will descend into outright savagery.

Yet none of the other boys—with the notable exception of Simon and Piggy—are remotely interested in establishing any semblance of civilization. Most of the boys just want to have fun. Free from sustained adult supervision for the first time in their short lives, they'd much rather spend their time skinny-dipping or hunting than getting down to the hard graft of building fires and constructing shelters. So right from the get-go, Ralph finds himself in conflict with most of the other boys, even during that all-too-brief period when they accept him as their leader.

At the same time, Ralph himself is still a boy, and as such he has a natural desire to be one of the boys....

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 853 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

mwestwood, M.A. eNotes educator | Certified Educator

bookM.A. from The University of Alabama


calendarEducator since 2006

write16,150 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

check Approved by eNotes Editorial

pohnpei397 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2009

write35,413 answers

starTop subjects are History, Literature, and Social Sciences

check Approved by eNotes Editorial