In the short story, "Charles" by Shirley Jackson, what are the internal and external conflicts, and how are they resolved?

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The short story “Charles” by Shirley Jackson there are examples of both internal and external conflict.

The protagonist, Laurie, exhibits conflict within himself, internal conflict. As a young kindergarten student, Laurie, exhibits inappropriate behavior. In an effort to justify the misbehavior he creates an imaginary, insubordinate child named Charles. He reports all of Charles’ misdeeds to his parents as he struggles with his own actions. Due to his lack of firm expectations at home, Laurie is unsure of his boundaries at school, and for a few weeks, he tests his teacher’s patience by breaking many rules. As he becomes accustomed to school guidelines, Laurie begins to acquiesce and becomes the “teacher’s helper.” The inner conflict begins to resolve.

 During the third and fourth weeks it looked like a reformation in Charles; Laurie reported grimly at lunch on Thursday of the third week, “Charles was so good today the teacher gave him an apple.”

“What?” I said, and my...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 661 words.)

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