What insight is directly stated in the piece? What insights are implied? Is there insight in any of the dialogue? Thoughts? Where do you find insight in the setting or characters in the story? What deeper meanings about life and love does "White Angel" attempt to address?

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Please note that the post contains numerous questions. The eNotes Homework Help policy allows for one question per post. This answer addresses elements of several questions.

Early in the story, the narrator reveals that his older brother had died, but the first page or so sets the stage for the...

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Please note that the post contains numerous questions. The eNotes Homework Help policy allows for one question per post. This answer addresses elements of several questions.

Early in the story, the narrator reveals that his older brother had died, but the first page or so sets the stage for the environment where the boys and their parents lived. The story consists entirely of the memories of the narrator, Robert and his brother, Carlton—bestowed the nickname Frisco.

Because the story features a first-person narrator, the main insights that he offers are into his own thoughts and feelings. Robert presents himself as having strong insights, but the reader cannot know how much his memory is embellishing the events that took place years before. The nine-year-old boy clearly idolized his teenage brother, and followed his lead in many dangerous pursuits, including taking drugs.

In one example, Robert looks at his brother’s too-bright eyes, under the influence of LSD:

Something in them tells me he can see the future, a ghost that hovers over everybody’s head.

This future ghost is Carlton himself, which the adult Robert knows, so he may be projecting back rather than remembering what he thought at the time.

The setting juxtaposes the mundane environment of suburban tract homes with the wilder, older cemetery behind their house. Carlton’s imagination takes them beyond their routine life, as when he opens the window at night and tells Robert they are flying. This episode also has foreshadowing of the disaster to come:

We both know we have taken momentary leave of the earth. It does not strike either of us as remarkable, any more than does the fact that airplanes sometimes fall from the sky.

The wildness of the outside invades their home, when Carlton’s friends, apparently all high on drugs, arrive at a party the parents are hosting. The time of the sixties becomes most significant during this party when the young people’s music fuels the evening’s wildness and Robert sees a different future:

A wildness sets in. Carlton throws new music on the turntable—Janis Joplin, the Doors, the Dead. The future shines for everyone, rich with the possibility of more nights exactly like this.

In his choice of music, Robert nonetheless foreshadows Carlton’s death because Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison of the Doors both died young, and in the name of the (Grateful) Dead band. After their parents send Robert to bed, the way he remembers the story clearly reveals his guilt over Carlton’s death, which happened in an accident late that night. Wide awake in his room upstairs, he broods as he hears the music:

As the Doors thump "Strange Days," I hope somethiog awful happens to him. I say so to myself.

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