What indicaitions are there in Lady Macbeth's opening comments that she is not as strong?Act 2 scene 2 What line shows Lady Macbeth is fearful? Conscience stricken?

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kc4u | College Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

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Look at these lines from Lady Macbeth's second soliloquy in act 1 scene 5 :

.....................................Come, you spirits

That tend on mortal thoughts! unsex me here,

And feel me, from the crown to the toe, top-full

Of direst cruelty; make thick my blood,

Stop up the access and passage to remorse,

That no compunctious visitings of nature

Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace bwtween

The effect and it!

Lady Macbeth here invokes the forces of darkness and evil and seeks support from them so that she can appropriate enough cruelty and remorselessness to act upon the plan of killing Duncan.

Lady Macbeth's prayer to the same invisible forces to turn her milk into gall and her prayer for a thick blanket of hellish darkness also indicate that she suffers from fears of conscience. However, she makes herself fearfully determined when she euphemistically refers to Duncan's arrival and stay at their castle for the night :' He that's coming/Must be provided for'.

If your question relates to act 2 scene 2, the opening soliloquy of Lady Macbeth divulges her failing strength, her fear and resistance of conscience :

............................................................Hark! Peace!

It was the owl that shriek'd, the fatal bellman,

Which gives the stern'st good-night.

Lady Macbeth resorted to drink to embolden herself. But she could not kill Duncan:

.......................................Had he not resembled

My father as he slept, I had done 't.

 

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