What are the important events in Narnia, and what are the important items in Narnia?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

The Chronicles of Narnia spans a large period of time in which several events occur and many characters are introduced. Essentially, though, Lewis' creative fantasy series provides an allegorical look at the timeline of the Christian faith, which echoes Lewis' own strong faith.

In The Magician's Nephew , the reader...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

The Chronicles of Narnia spans a large period of time in which several events occur and many characters are introduced. Essentially, though, Lewis' creative fantasy series provides an allegorical look at the timeline of the Christian faith, which echoes Lewis' own strong faith.

In The Magician's Nephew, the reader sees Narnia first created by the song of Aslan as well as the introduction of evil into Narnia through the character of Jadis when the two characters from earth, Digory and Polly, bring her there. In The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Aslan dies for the sake of the undeserving and rises again to vanquish Jadis, the White Witch, before leaving the Pevensie brothers and sisters in charge as kings and queens of Narnia. Prince Caspian, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, The Horse and his Boy, and The Silver Chair all provide stories of adventure that return to the ideas of Narnia's uniqueness and Aslan's ultimate power. The Last Battle reveals the ending of Narnia in which a deceitful character is introduced who leads some Narnians astray while others come to the knowledge that Narnia and the Aslan's country are one and the same. The allegorical ties between the story of Narnia and Christianity with its creation, fall, sacrifice, resurrection, struggle, deceit, and ultimate atonement are clearly developed by Lewis.

One symbol that is important to the series as a whole is Aslan's table on which Aslan was killed and is therefore a representation of self-sacrifice and ultimate victory. The weapons that were originally given to the Pevensie children are also used multiple times throughout the series and serve as symbols of strong leadership and Aslan's faithfulness.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

In The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis, Narnia has a historical timeline like any other country. In The Magician's Nephew, Aslan sings Narnia into existence. The Empress Jadis, who later becomes the White Witch, brings evil into the world. Since Narnia is young and fertile, a piece of iron dropped on the ground grows into a lamppost, which becomes a significant object in The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe. This novel details the White Witch's rule over Narnia, where she uses her magic to make it always winter. The four Pevensie siblings enter Narnia, defeat the Witch, and rule as kings and queens in harmony. (The Horse and His Boy tells the story of Shasta and Bree, who escape Calormen and go to Narnia for freedom during this time period.) In Prince Caspian, Narnia has been taken over by Telmarine soldiers. Prince Caspian, with the help of the Pevensies, gives Narnia back to its true owners. In The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, Caspian rules as King of Narnia. He explores every corner of the map to find seven lost lords. In The Silver Chair, two characters named Eustace and Jill search all of Narnia to find Rilian, Caspian's son. In the final novel, The Last Battle, Narnia comes to an end. Readers are shown the true Narnia, which is Aslan's Kingdom. 

As the first several novels are most popular, they contain what can be called the most important objects. Three of the Pevensie children are given gifts that will help them restore Narnia. Peter receives a sword and shield, Susan receives a bow with arrows and a horn that will summon help whenever it is blown, and Lucy receives an elixir that will heal any wound. They become icons of good government and of a peaceful era. Aslan, as a lion, is the symbol of a true king. 

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team