Is weather used symbolically in "The Great Gatsby"?

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The weather has symbolic significance at several points in The Great Gatsby. The most intense instance of this is in Fitzgerald's constant references to the heat in chapter seven. The point is made over and over again:

Hot!" said the conductor to familiar faces. "Some weather! Hot! Hot! Hot! Is it hot enough for you? Is it hot? Is it . . . ?"

My commutation ticket came back to me with a dark stain from his hand. That any one should care in this heat whose flushed lips he kissed, whose head made damp the pajama pocket over his heart!

Daisy even uses the oppressive heat as a reason or an excuse for them to make their ill-fated journey into the city:

"But it's so hot," insisted Daisy, on the verge of tears, "And everything's so confused. Let's all go to town!"

Her voice struggled on through the heat, beating against it, moulding its senselessness into forms.

Here, the heat operates and oppresses on both a literal and a symbolic level. It causes irritability and fractiousness in the characters even...

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