What implications does The Lovely Bones have on life? How is The Lovely Bones realistic?

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Alice Sebold's novel The Lovely Bones is realistic because its characters grapple with grief in "unheroic" ways.  Jack Salmon becomes almost obsessed with finding Susie's murderer; and rather than dealing with his grief, Jack channels all of his feelings of loss into his search.  His wife Abigail also cannot...

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Alice Sebold's novel The Lovely Bones is realistic because its characters grapple with grief in "unheroic" ways.  Jack Salmon becomes almost obsessed with finding Susie's murderer; and rather than dealing with his grief, Jack channels all of his feelings of loss into his search.  His wife Abigail also cannot seem to properly deal with Susie's disappearance and death, and she retreats from her family and eventually has an affair and temporarily abandons her family.  These parents are not able to remain strong for their other children, and the family suffers.  But Jack's and Abigail's responses to their daughter's death are very real and understandable.  The Lovely Bones has implications on how we deal with grief, and what we expect from others while we are dealing with grief.  The portrayal of the Salmon parents in the novel suggests the harsh reality of dealing with the death of a loved one.

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