What were the impacts of the Muslim League on the nationalist movement?

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Firstly, I must make an important correction: the partition of the Indian subcontinent occurred in 1947 . Indeed, it occurred shortly after the British relinquished their colonial rule of India, due to no longer being able to afford to maintain the country after its war expenditures. Lord Louis Mountbatten played...

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Firstly, I must make an important correction: the partition of the Indian subcontinent occurred in 1947. Indeed, it occurred shortly after the British relinquished their colonial rule of India, due to no longer being able to afford to maintain the country after its war expenditures. Lord Louis Mountbatten played a role in facilitating the partition.

One of the most prominent members of the Muslim League was Mohammed Ali Jinnah, sometimes called "the Great Leader," who served as the leader of the Muslim League and was the founder and first governor-in-chief of Pakistan. Jinnah started his political career in 1906 and had initially been a member of the Indian National Congress. However, he became disillusioned with the singularly Hindu approach to politics and looked favorably upon British institutions, hoping that India could also one day install similar forms of infrastructure. Therefore, when Mahatma Gandhi became the leader of the Congress Party in 1920, Jinnah opposed Gandhi's boycotts of British institutions in India. He also disliked Gandhi's Hindu approach to politics, which did not take proper consideration of minorities, particularly Muslims. These factors led to Jinnah's support of a separate state for Muslims, which was facilitated under the leadership of the Muslim League.

Though Jinnah remained a vocal supporter of Hindu-Muslim unity around this time, he withdrew from the Congress Party. Initially reluctant to form a separate state for Muslims, and opposed at first by both the Congress Party and the British government, both of whom found the idea of partition ridiculous, Jinnah forged ahead to help create Pakistan. He is regarded as "the father of Pakistan."

The creation of the new state was not peaceful and resulted in notoriously tragic religious massacres, during which Hindus and Sikhs fleeing from Pakistan to India were murdered by Muslims, and Muslims leaving India for Pakistan were killed by Hindus. The history of violence between India and Pakistan has fueled lingering resentment between the countries, which persists to date. It has inspired the conflict over Kashmir, a territory in the Himalayas, and threats of nuclear war between the countries.

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Sir Syed Ahmad Khan (1817–98) was instrumental in the formation of the All-India Muslim League (AIML), popularly known as the Muslim League. This became important as people in India rose up to end British colonial rule. Many Indian Muslims were concerned that freedom from the British colonial powers would not benefit Muslims if the result was ending up a minority in a Hindu-controlled India. Thus the Muslim League advocated for a two-state solution, partitioning India into a Hindu state (modern India) and a Muslim one (modern Pakistan), an aim that became reality in the partition of 1946.

The Muslim League played an important role in the negotiations surrounding partition. Once Pakistan was born as an independent nation, the Pakistan Muslim League became a major political force in Pakistan, and is still one of the major political parties.

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