What impacts did the Cold War's foreign policy have on American life?

The Cold War's foreign policy affected American life by instilling a notion of fear and paranoia into the atmosphere. The threat of nuclear bombs and Soviet spies created a cycle of fear that permeated social society. The proxy wars that were fought during this time period were also highly unpopular due to their high mortality rates.

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Overall, the main impact of America's Cold War foreign policy was to create an atmosphere of anxiety and even paranoia at home. The nuclear arms race made the notion of complete nuclear annihilation a possibility. School children practiced "duck and cover" drills in the classroom. People constructed bunkers in their...

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Overall, the main impact of America's Cold War foreign policy was to create an atmosphere of anxiety and even paranoia at home. The nuclear arms race made the notion of complete nuclear annihilation a possibility. School children practiced "duck and cover" drills in the classroom. People constructed bunkers in their basements and backyards. Every community had an air raid siren and a contingency plan in place. The idea that the Soviets could drop a nuclear bomb became a very real fear.

In the 1950s, the idea that there could be communist agitators and spies lurking in the midst of American society took hold. People went to great lengths to prove their loyalty since the mere accusation of Communist sympathies could be disastrous.

Perhaps the most tangible impact of Cold War foreign policy was the proxy wars the United States became involved in. In an effort to "contain" communism, the country sent its military into several overseas theaters. In Korea and in Vietnam, this boiled over into full-blown warfare. With many members of the American military fighting and dying, divisions in the country grew. Millions of young men were drafted to fight in these wars, which took place in countries that many had never even heard of. Some people began to question the righteousness of the ideological fight that led to so many deaths. Partly fueled by anti-war sentiments, a massive counter-culture movement emerged in the late 1960s. This led to huge divisions and unrest in the United States.

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