What impact did the New Deal have on women?

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President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal was a series of projects and programs designed to alleviate the difficulties caused by the Great Depression. It had a great effect on women, due largely to the efforts of the first lady: Eleanor Roosevelt. She untiringly lobbied the heads of federal relief programs...

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President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal was a series of projects and programs designed to alleviate the difficulties caused by the Great Depression. It had a great effect on women, due largely to the efforts of the first lady: Eleanor Roosevelt. She untiringly lobbied the heads of federal relief programs and traveled the country to champion the rights not only of women but also of African Americans, the poor, and young people. In November of 1933, she hosted a special White House conference on the emergency needs of women.

Due to his wife's persistence and insistence, during the era of the New Deal, President Roosevelt placed an unprecedented amount of women in important positions in government. For instance, Frances Perkins, as Secretary of Labor, became the first woman in American history to serve in the president's cabinet. Josephine Roche became Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, Hilda Smith became Director of Workers' Education in the WPA, and Clara Beyer became Associate Director of the Division of Labor Standards.

Mrs. Roosevelt also pushed for a women's division of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and a woman, Eleanor Woodward, was appointed to head it. At its peak in 1936, the women's division of the WPA, a part of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, employed almost 500,000 women. The Fair Labor Relations Act and the Fair Labor Standards Act were New Deal initiatives that guaranteed minimum wages, maximum hours, and the workers' right to organize, and woman workers were also covered by these laws.

In conclusion, we can see that the New Deal, through the efforts of Eleanor Roosevelt, had a profound impact on the rights of women in America and on the appointments of women to important positions in American government.

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The New Deal impacted women by increasing their participation in the workforce and involving them in governmental leadership. Much like men, women suffered from high rates of unemployment during The Great Depression. Moreover, they did not have any advocates within the government. That changed with Eleanor Roosevelt. She championed the increase in attention to the American woman, who struggled just as much as the man.

Because of this increased focus, women became more heavily involved within New Deal programs and the government itself. Frances Perkins was the first woman nominated to a cabinet position when she became the US Secretary of Labor. A program within the WPA was created called the Women's Professional Projects Division. Relief opportunities reached nearly 750,000 women because of the New Deal. Those women who did not directly benefit from employment still received some help through the Food Stamp Program and the various Welfare programs.

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President Franklin Roosevelt's "New Deal" has been credited with having a far-reaching impact on American workers, however, in many cases its benefits were narrowly defined so as to circumscribe the female workforce.

For instance, the Fair Labor Standards Act—which established a federal minimum wage and maximum workweek—did not apply to some professions traditionally occupied by women, such as retail clerks. In addition, just seven per cent of jobs created by the Civilian Works Administration were occupied by women and about one-quarter of the National Recovery Administration's wage codes provided for a working wage less for women than that set for men.

Nonetheless, some New Deal programs did offer direct benefit to females. The National Youth Administration, for example, offered educational and financial aid for youth ages 16 to 25 years old, with many women taking advantage of its opportunities.

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Women were impacted by the New Deal. Eleanor Roosevelt was a great advocate for women being included in the various New Deal programs. She received thousands of letters highlighting the suffering that women experienced during the Great Depression. As a result, she insisted that women be included in the provisions of some of the New Deal Programs.

As a result of her efforts, women were impacted by the New Deal. A special division for women was created in the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and it run by a woman whose name was Ellen Woodward. Each state needed to have a woman in charge of the state’s program for women.

Mrs. Roosevelt held a conference on the needs of women. There were some issues that concerned Mrs. Roosevelt. For example, a very small percentage of women received jobs from Civilian Works Administration. Also, the pay for women was also lower than pay for men. Eventually, women received more unemployment benefits as a part of the Works Progress Administration. Women also benefited from the passage of labor laws such as the Fair Labor Relations Act and the Fair Labor Standards Act. Women also were put into positions of responsibility and authority. For example, Frances Perkins became the Secretary of Labor. She was the first female cabinet member in our history.

Women were impacted by and benefitted from some of the programs of the New Deal.

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