What images of water and autumn are presented in the poem "The Vagabond"?

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Robert Louis Stevenson's poem "The Vagabond " is a celebration of the simple, rural life. The eponymous "vagabond," who is the speaker of the poem, is a person with no home who wanders from place to place. He enjoys the simple pleasures of his life—such as walking in...

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Robert Louis Stevenson's poem "The Vagabond" is a celebration of the simple, rural life. The eponymous "vagabond," who is the speaker of the poem, is a person with no home who wanders from place to place. He enjoys the simple pleasures of his life—such as walking in the open air—and says that he doesn't care at all for wealth or friends.

In the first stanza, the speaker describes the life he loves: walking through he countryside, with the stars above him. He describes dipping bread "in the river" as a part of this idyllic life. This image compounds the impression that this life is a life of simple pleasures.

In the third stanza, the speaker says, "let autumn fall on me," and then, at the end of the stanza, he declares "Not to autumn will I yield, / Not to winter even." Here then the speaker is defiant. He says that the simple, nomadic life is the life for him, even if it means enduring the autumn and winter months. All he asks for, as he says at the end of the second and fourth stanzas, is "the heaven above / And the road below."

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