What imagery is used in Act Three, scene one, during Hamlet's soliloquy in Shakespeare's Hamlet?

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Images (imagery) express ideas primarily by using the five senses: sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell. Hamlet's soliloquy, in which he contemplates and rejects suicide as a solution to his troubles, is replete with imagery.

Hamlet visualizes his troubles--chiefly, what to do about avenging his father's death--in physical terms, describing them as slings (meaning the rocks shot from a sling shot) and arrows hitting him. If we think about the image, it's painful--who wants to be shot with arrows or hit with stones? Hamlet, in other words, feels his mental anguish as physical pain. He then visualizes his troubles as a "sea," meaning that they are large and all encompassing, perhaps drowning him. 

In contrast to the pain of his problems, Hamlet uses images of sleep to describe death. Like sleep, death is an escape from pain, an oblivion. But then Hamlet realizes that death is different from sleep--it is not oblivion, but a physical place, an "undiscovered country." Nobody returns from this...

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