What are the ideas or values presented in The Picture of Dorian Gray?

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Dorian comes to regret with all his heart the devil's bargain he has made to trade his own body's aging and growing ugly with the portrait doing it instead. He realizes too late that it has corrupted him and made him evil to be able to get away with depravity...

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Dorian comes to regret with all his heart the devil's bargain he has made to trade his own body's aging and growing ugly with the portrait doing it instead. He realizes too late that it has corrupted him and made him evil to be able to get away with depravity and cruelty and still look young and innocent. As he comes to the end of his saga, he feels sad and soiled, and he

felt a wild longing for the unstained purity of his boyhood—his rose-white boyhood, as Lord Henry had once called it.

He repents of having prayed the portrait age for him. He now realizes there is no free ride and that he was allowed to get away with things that have come back to haunt and torment him. He craves punishment, because it would purify him. He thinks:

Ah! in what a monstrous moment of pride and passion he had prayed that the portrait should bear the burden of his days, and he keep the unsullied splendour of eternal youth! All his failure had been due to that. Better for him that each sin of his life had brought its sure swift penalty along with it. There was purification in punishment. Not "Forgive us our sins" but "Smite us for our iniquities" should be the prayer of man to a most just God.

The novel thus conveys traditional Christian moral values: a person's soul will be in torment until they pay for their crimes. There is no cheating God: one way or another, our sins catch up with us.

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Well, there are clearly many possible answers to this excellent question. I will respond by just focussing on one alone, which is the Gothic idea of the double or the doppelganger. Running throughout this excellent Victorian Gothic novel is the idea that we have another "self" and the way that this "self" is actually a much more frightening manifestation of us than we allow to appear in our normal lives. In Gothic literature, this idea of the double is terrifying on the one hand, in terms of the way that it questions the uniqueness of identity, but at the same time it is also alien, as we project into our other selves aspects of our psyche that we repress or ignore.

Of course, the doppelganger in this novel is the painting of Dorian, that he describes as a mirror to his soul. Significantly, after the death of Sybil Vane and his acceptance of its power to reveal his own inner corruption whilst preserving his youthful beauty, he says:

Eternal youth, infinite passion, pleasures subtle and secret, wild joys and wilder sins--he was to have all these things. The portrait was to bear the burden of his shame; that was all.

The relationship between Dorian and his portrait is thus established, and through the Faustian pact that Dorian makes, he is able to preserve his beauty and innocence overtly whilst being free to indulge in all of his most corrupted vices. Thus Dorian splits his soul and body in a way that will have unforeseen consequences for himself, as the end of the story indicates.

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