Please define "soliloquy" and "dramatic irony," using Iago from Othello as an example of each.

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Soliloquy is defined elsewhere on eNotes (see reference links, below).

Dramatic irony occurs when the reader of a text (or viewer of a play or film) knows something that one or more characters does not know. This device creates suspense and conflict. Shakespeare frequently used the soliloquy to create dramatic irony...

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Soliloquy is defined elsewhere on eNotes (see reference links, below).

Dramatic irony occurs when the reader of a text (or viewer of a play or film) knows something that one or more characters does not know. This device creates suspense and conflict. Shakespeare frequently used the soliloquy to create dramatic irony for the audience by having a character alone onstage speaking of his or her plans.

An example of dramatic irony in Othello is that Iago pretends to be Othello's friend, but the audience knows that Iago secretly hates Othello.

An example of Iago delivering a soliloquy occurs at the end of Act II, scene 1, when Iago is alone on stage, speaking aloud, and reveals his plan to incite Othello's jealousy and bring about Othello's ultimate downfall.

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