What happens when the Baptist minister calls on Miss Emily?

The Baptist minister would never tell anyone what happened when he called on Miss Emily, and he refused to go back. It is implied that, at the very least, he had a frosty reception. Following his visit, the minister's wife writes a letter to cousins of Miss Emily in Alabama, likely out of concern for Emily's reputation and health.

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When Miss Emily's relationship with Homer Barron begins to excite comment in Jefferson, some of the ladies in town force the Baptist minister to call on her. The Griersons are Episcopalian, which suggests a class difference as well as a religious one, so it is not at all clear...

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When Miss Emily's relationship with Homer Barron begins to excite comment in Jefferson, some of the ladies in town force the Baptist minister to call on her. The Griersons are Episcopalian, which suggests a class difference as well as a religious one, so it is not at all clear what the Baptist minister would say to Miss Emily in such a case.

The matter remains unclear, since the minister "would never divulge what happened during that interview." He also refuses to return to the house, and his wife writes instead to a branch of the Grierson family in Alabama, resulting in the arrival of two female cousins to stay with Miss Emily and presumably to act as chaperones.

Judging from Miss Emily's interactions with other people in Jefferson and her haughty refusal to be judged by the same standards as other people (or, indeed, to submit to any form of judgment at all), the reader will probably surmise that the Baptist minister had a frosty reception. Miss Emily's modus operandi tends to be a complete refusal to listen as well as a display of astonishment that anyone could be so impudent as to question her rather than outright anger. It seems clear that, whatever she said or however she acted, she made the minister feel very foolish, enough so that he wished to avoid discussing what happened or repeating the experience.

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