What happens when Holden has a date with Sally in chapter 17 of The Catcher in the Rye? Does Sally feel close to Holden? Holden likes Jane and doesn't like Sally, but he has a date with Sally. Maybe this is because Sally said that she won't be going to Vermont when Holden asked her.

In chapter 17 of The Catcher in the Rye, Holden has a horrible date with Sally Hayes when he takes her to a show and agrees to go ice-skating with her at Radio City. Holden experiences mixed feelings for Sally, who does not truly understand him. Sally is depicted as shallow and phony. She seems to like Holden but does not connect with him on a deeper level.

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In chapter 17 of The Catcher in the Rye , Holden's neuroticism and instability are particularly marked. Never a reliable narrator, he is less reliable here than anywhere else. He admits this himself, since, on first seeing Sally, his first reaction is that he is in love with her and...

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In chapter 17 of The Catcher in the Rye, Holden's neuroticism and instability are particularly marked. Never a reliable narrator, he is less reliable here than anywhere else. He admits this himself, since, on first seeing Sally, his first reaction is that he is in love with her and wants to get married, even though he simultaneously admits that he does not like her much.

This tension is evident throughout the chapter. Holden continually complains that Sally is phony, but he is being just as phony himself. He tells her that he loves her and asks her to come away with him to Massachusetts or Vermont. At the same time, it is clear that he dislikes her personality and is only captivated by her physical attractiveness. When they meet a male acquaintance of Sally's, he is sullen and resentful, admitting that he "sort of hated old Sally" after she spends too long talking to the other man.

It is clear that Sally likes Holden and is willing to forgive him a good deal of bad behavior. She seems to want to have a fairly normal teenage relationship with him, one which does not involve indulging every extreme whim he expresses. This, for Sally, is simple self-protection. Holden is irritated with her after a few minutes of conversation. It is difficult to imagine the two of them enjoying weeks together in a cabin in Vermont. Holden admits this himself at the end of the chapter and says that he probably would not have taken her with him in any case. Ultimately, he prefers Jane to Sally, but this is at least partly because Jane's absence makes it easy to project his desires onto her, whereas Sally's presence makes this impossible. Sally's attraction to Holden may be shallow, but his feelings for her are no deeper.

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Holden has a terrible time with Sally Hayes, who is attractive but acts like a complete phony. Holden ends up meeting Sally in the city and makes out with her during the cab ride to the theater. On their way to the show, Holden decides to marry Sally and says he is in love with her even though he isn't. His irrational, impulsive demeanor reflects his anxiety and mental instability. Holden is physically attracted to Sally but cannot stand her personality and is uncertain about his own future.

As always, Holden is critical of the actors’ performances and is disgusted when Sally befriends an acquaintance during intermission. Holden views their conversation as meaningless, phony, and repulsive. Sally then insists they go ice skating at Radio City, and Holden becomes increasingly hysterical when he suggests they should run away to New England and live in a cabin together. Holden comes completely unhinged, and Sally begs him to quiet down. Sally then reminds Holden they are too young, which is something he finds irritating to the point that he calls her a "royal pain in the ass."

Once Holden calls Sally a "royal pain in the ass," she breaks into tears and he apologizes to her like a madman. The date ends on a sour note, and they go their separate ways. Holden's horrific date with Sally reveals his hypocritical nature, mental instability, and judgmental personality. Holden is seeking genuine social interactions but refuses to contact Jane Gallagher, the one person who truly understands him. Although Sally finds Holden attractive and exciting, she is too shallow to genuinely care about him. Both Holden and Sally are not good for each other, and Holden needs to focus on himself before being in a relationship.

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Holden's date with Sally is pretty much a disaster.  She arrives at the hotel ten minutes late, and acts as if she is delighted to see Holden, but in reality she is very fake.  On the way to the show Holden is taking her to see, the two "(horse) around a little bit in the cab", even though at first Sally does not want to because she will mess up her makeup.  As they "(come) out of this big clinch", Holden tells Sally he loves her, and she says she loves him too.  Neither one of them mean it.

At the first intermission of the play, Sally meets a guy she knows, and the two spend the whole time talking.  After the show, Holden is afraid the guy is going to accompany them back in the cab, but as it turns out, he has to go to a party.  When he leaves, Sally suggests to Holden that they go ice skating, which they do, but neither of them is very good at the sport.  Holden finally suggests that they go inside and have a drink, which they also do.  Sally by this time is cross because her ankles hurt from skating, and Holden makes things worse by starting to talk about how depressed he is.  He asks Sally if she would like to "get away" with him, and maybe even get married", but Sally responds with anger and frustration, telling him that they have "oodles of time to do those things".  The conversation ends in an argument, and Holden tells Sally she is "a royal pain in the ass"; she starts crying and won't accept his apology, so he leaves alone.

Sally is too self-absorbed to feel close to Holden.  She is a classic "phony", and does not recognize that he really is in a bad way.  In contrast, Jane, for whom Holden has real respect, is wholesome and more sensitive.  Sally is the kind of girl who really is just out to have fun; she cares little for other people in general.  She is shallow, which is an attribute Holden hates, while Jane is the real deal.  Jane is unattainable, however, while Sally is available to have a good time with (Chapter 17).

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