What happens to the pigs' appearance in Animal Farm?

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The pigs do begin to appear to be more human, demonstrating the type of leaders they have become.  The significance behind this, however, is less literal than that.  It is important to note that Orwell chooses to portray the pigs in this way at the very end of the book to achieve one of his themes:  that power may shift after a revolution, but oftentimes things will stay just about the same for the proletariat, or working, class.  Power corrupts; as it did Mr. Jones in the beginning of the book, so it has the pigs.  Life for the rest of the animals remains the same, or worse.

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The major change in the pigs' appearance comes in the very last pages of the book. By acting more and more like humans, and through taking on human characteristics (which range from running things to living in the house), the pigs eventually become indistinguishable from humans. Squealer and the other pigs even start walking on their hind legs, until, as the final line of the book says, "The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which."

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