What happens to the original cell's chromosomes during fission?

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Fission or binary fission is a process of cell division, used by single-celled organisms (also known as prokaryotes). This division is a form of asexual reproduction and results in a genetically identical offspring. Prokaryotes contain a single DNA molecule. During the fission process, replication of this DNA molecules occurs and...

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Fission or binary fission is a process of cell division, used by single-celled organisms (also known as prokaryotes). This division is a form of asexual reproduction and results in a genetically identical offspring. Prokaryotes contain a single DNA molecule. During the fission process, replication of this DNA molecules occurs and the cell ends up with two copies of DNA molecule. These molecules are separated and are attached to different parts of cell membrane. This part of fission process is followed by actual cell division into two daughter cells. Each daughter cell ends up with one DNA molecule. Thus, each daughter cell is identical to the parent cell in all respects and the number of chromosomes are same in both the parent and daughter cells.

In comparison, eukaryotes undergo sexual reproduction.

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