What happens if mitotic division doesn't occur? What happens if meiosis doesn't occur?  

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Mitosis is the process of cell division where the resulting cells, called daughter cells, share the identity and function of the original cell. This is normally the process used for growth, maintenance and healing. This is also the process used to distinguish the different cell types early in the life...

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Mitosis is the process of cell division where the resulting cells, called daughter cells, share the identity and function of the original cell. This is normally the process used for growth, maintenance and healing. This is also the process used to distinguish the different cell types early in the life of the organism, and so at these phases it also plays a role in tissue differentiation and specialization.

If mitosis didn't occur, the effects would depend upon the age and maturity of the organism. If we were talking about something like a fertilized egg, composed of only a single undifferentiated cell, then the organism would fail to grow and develop. It would be unable to attain the specializations necessary to mature according to its programming, and it would probably lyse and die. If, on the other hand, the organism was mature, as in a fully grown adult, then a cessation of mitosis would cause injuries to accumulate and attrition through natural wear and apoptosis to build up, probably leading to organ failure.

Meiosis is the process of cell division solely for the purpose of reproduction. In most sexually reproducing organisms, specialized cells are responsible for this process and the creation of gametes. If these cells failed to function, then the most likely, and probably the only effect, would be that the organism would be unable to produce gametes, and therefore could not reproduce. 

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