What happens in the public place, and how does it affect Romeo and Juliet's plans in act 3?

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Act III is where the story begins to reach its climax. While walking in what readers can only assume is the town square, Benvolio and Mercutio are confronted by Tybalt and his flunkies. Tybalt is still sore over Romeo attending the Capulet's ball. Just as they begin to have...

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Act III is where the story begins to reach its climax. While walking in what readers can only assume is the town square, Benvolio and Mercutio are confronted by Tybalt and his flunkies. Tybalt is still sore over Romeo attending the Capulet's ball. Just as they begin to have words, Romeo enters and Tybalt challenges him to a fight.

Romeo pleads with Tybalt not to fight. What Tybalt isn't privy to, is that he and Romeo are now kinsmen. Mercutio is disgusted by what he believes is Romeo's cowardice and takes Tybalt up on his challenge. As Romeo continues to implore Mercutio not to fight, Tybalt takes advantage of the distraction and kills Mercutio. In a rage, Romeo kills Tybalt.

This incident changes the lover's plans because after all of this takes place, Romeo is banished.

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