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The Witch of Blackbird Pond

by Elizabeth George Speare
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What happened to Mercy and Judith at the end of The Witch of Blackbird Pond

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The final two chapters of The Witch of Blackbird Pond move quite quickly through multiple months of time. When chapter 20 begins, Mercy is just finally healthy enough to get out of bed, and Kit and William are still a potential couple. William comes over to the house, and he...

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The final two chapters of The Witch of Blackbird Pond move quite quickly through multiple months of time. When chapter 20 begins, Mercy is just finally healthy enough to get out of bed, and Kit and William are still a potential couple. William comes over to the house, and he and Kit have an honest conversation. The result is that they both agree that they are not well suited to each other. They part on amicable terms and don't see each other again until about a month later at Thankful Peabody's wedding.

The wedding is good, but it ends with bad news of John's capture. Judith faints, and William is quickly by her side to attend to her. He takes her home in his sleigh. Christmas passes. January passes. February passes, and Judith and William are in the midst of a beginning to pursue a relationship. March comes with a new blizzard, and a haggard and weak John Holbrook stumbles through the door and collapses with his head in Mercy's lap.

Chapter 21 begins immediately after, but it is already April. Readers are told that a double wedding is being planned for Judith and William and Mercy and John. John and Mercy plan to move to a nearby parish where John will begin working. William's house is nearing completion, and Judith is having a great time figuring out what furnishings will go where. Readers don't get additional information about Judith or Mercy, but the reader can assume the standard "they lived happily ever after."

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