What is Hamlet's attitude towards women?

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It is as though, in Hamlet's mind, women can be only either virgins or whores. There seems to be no in-between for him. After Ophelia has, essentially, broken up with him, he tells her, "Get thee to a nunnery. Why wouldst thou be a breeder of sinners?" (3.1.131). While a nunnery, in most contexts, refers to an actual convent where nuns live and pray, it can also be used, mockingly, to refer to a brothel, a place where prostitutes live and work. It is possible that Hamlet is accusing Ophelia of playing the nun while really acting like a whore. Perhaps they have slept together (an interpretation supported by the songs she sings in her madness later in the play), and her leaving him has surprised him and caused him to feel betrayed by her?

Hamlet goes on to say that, even if Ophelia were as pure as fresh snow, she would not be able to escape slanders on her reputation. So, it would be better to go to a "nunnery." Or, if she wants to marry, then she should marry a fool,...

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