To what does the title "The Great Divorce," by C. S. Lewis,  refer? Is it divorce of heaven and hell, good and evil, or both?

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C. S. Lewis addresses why he gave The Great Divorce its title in the preface of his book. He states that it is in answer to William Blake's book The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, but whereas Blake argues that heaven and hell are the same place and that there is no such thing as good and evil, Lewis argues that there is an "unavoidable either-or." He agrees that people will almost certainly experience both states during their lifetime but says that at some point they will have to make a choice.

We are not living in a world where all roads are radii of a circle and where all, if followed long enough, will therefore draw gradually nearer and finally meet at the centre: rather in a world where every road, after a few miles forks into two, and each of those into two again, and at each fork you must make a decision.

C. S. Lewis calls the choice we have to make between good and evil the Great Divorce, meaning that Heaven and Hell are separate places. However, he does call it a choice and states that

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