What is a good quote from the book called Farewell to Manzanar?

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Here is another good quote from the book Farewell to Manzanar:

Like so many of the women there, Mama never did get used to the latrines. It was a humiliation she just learned to endure: shigata ga nai , this cannot be helped. She would quickly subordinate her own...

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Here is another good quote from the book Farewell to Manzanar:

Like so many of the women there, Mama never did get used to the latrines. It was a humiliation she just learned to endure: shigata ga nai, this cannot be helped. She would quickly subordinate her own desires to those of the family or the community, because she knew cooperation was the only way to survive (30).

In this excerpt, Jeanne speaks about the ways her mother adapts to life at Manzanar, the relocation camp where the family is forced to live because they are Japanese-Americans during World War II. She writes that her mother adapts an attitude of quiet resilience and accommodation. Mama accepts that nothing can be done except to live in the crowded camp as best she can, and she is guided by her commitment to her family and her community. She suppresses her own needs and wants, even though she desperately wants privacy, in favor of living amiably with others and doing the best she can for her family. The author writes that everyone in Manzanar has inherited these seemingly contradictory traits—accommodation to others and a desire to maintain one's privacy—from living in the crowded country of Japan.

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In chapter one, the narrator, Jeanne Wakatsuki, describes the day two FBI agents came to arrest her father. As he left Woody's place on Terminal Island, the men flanked Papa, and "He didn't struggle. There was no point to it. He had become a man without a country."

This quotation is a good one because it establishes the absurdity of the arrests of Japanese American people in the US after the attack on Pearl Harbor and what it meant for them. Jeanne's father was a Japanese immigrant who had built, over the course of thirty-five years, a commercial fishing business, owned two boats, and had children born in America. After the attack on Pearl Harbor he burned a Japanese flag and his identity papers. He wasn't able to become an American citizen because of the US government's policies, and so he literally was a man without a country. He was no longer a citizen of Japan, by choice, yet he was not, legally speaking, an American. His experiences after his arrest and the family's internment offered a tragically diminished life for him from which he never recovered.

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