what are the goals of employee selection?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

In the process of employee selection, hiring managers must take a number of things into account when making their decisions. While the ultimate goal is finding the most appropriate candidate for an open position, there are a number of objectives that they must consider when hiring an employee.

First, a...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

In the process of employee selection, hiring managers must take a number of things into account when making their decisions. While the ultimate goal is finding the most appropriate candidate for an open position, there are a number of objectives that they must consider when hiring an employee.

First, a candidate’s qualifications must match those required by the position. Prior education, degrees held, certifications, and previous experience in the relevant field are all things that hiring managers consider when selecting employees. Some positions become unavailable to candidates with certain criminal backgrounds. Having reached a certain age is also a requirement for some positions. These qualifications are often fixed requirements for employment, but they are sometimes an added benefit for a job that does not have extensive requirements for a potential employee.

Second, a hiring manager usually prefers that the employee provide letters of personal reference or reference contact information in order to verify the abilities and efficiency of their potential hire. The goal here is to use previous experience as a measuring rod for the decision-making process. Using previous managers and coworkers as reference sources allows for the hiring manager to know what the employee is like in the work environment.

Finally, the hiring manager is tasked with the goal of making sure that employee selection is mutually beneficial. The employee must be compensated adequately, and the employer must receive enough output from their workers in order to justify their position. The employee must demonstrate that they are willing to commit to the time and energy required by the position if the employer does not want to experience a high rate of turnover. Alternately, the employer must demonstrate that they can provide a safe, agreeable work environment in order to retain qualified, talented workers.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

When filling a vacancy at an organization, the most important step in the process is employee selection. Depending upon the job market, local area, and type of position, candidate pools can often be vast and hiring managers consider a lot of factors to hedge their bets that the selected candidate is the right one.

Goal 1: Meets minimum qualifications. Sometimes a job will have legal requirements (for example, a practicing attorney must be a member of the Bar Association), physical requirements, education requirements, or other bottom line items that a candidate must have in order to be a fit for the role.

Goal 2: Behaves professionally. During a phone screen or in-person interview, the interviewer will determine whether the candidate answers the phone nicely, dresses appropriately, and otherwise carries him/herself with the gravity the job requires.

Goal 3: Fits in the office culture. Every organization is different, and a hiring manager will want to find a candidate who fits in with the office in which they'll work.

Goal 4: Longevity meets expectations. It's essential to determine if a candidate is able to stay at a job for the longterm or, in the case of a temporary role, will be comfortable leaving when the position is complete.

Goal 5: Willing/able to accept the job. As important as it is to figure out if the candidate is right for the job, it's also important to see if the job is right for the candidate. Salary, benefits, location, and upward mobility are all factors that can make the difference between and good or bad fit.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Employee selection is an important part of the hiring process. Managers have several goals in mind in order to select the best employees for their organizations. 

First and foremost, employers want to hire qualified employees.  The hiring manager wants to make sure that the employee meets the qualifications for the position and/or will be able to meet the expectations of the position.  Employers want to hire individuals who will be successful in their organization.  If an employee is not suitable for the position, recruiting and rehiring a new employee can be costly for an organization. 

Second, a hiring manager wants to be sure that the employee is a good fit for the organization.  To determine if a person would work well with others in the department, hiring managers conduct interviews.  The purpose of the interview is to determine if the employee has the knowledge for the position and if they will be a good match for the organizational culture. 

Finally, a hiring manager wants to be sure that candidates can pass the appropriate background checks and reference checks.  Also, upon offering a position to a candidate, the hiring manager wants to be sure the salary and benefit expectations are met. 

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team