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Originating in the early 20th century in Britain, Georgian Poetry is a school of poetry inspired by nature and originally presented in a series of five works published by Harold Edward Monro. Called "Georgian poetry" as the original publications roughly coincided with the coronation of King George V, it was...

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Originating in the early 20th century in Britain, Georgian Poetry is a school of poetry inspired by nature and originally presented in a series of five works published by Harold Edward Monro. Called "Georgian poetry" as the original publications roughly coincided with the coronation of King George V, it was lyrical in form, romantic in content, and marked by a popular accessibility.

As a school of poetry, Georgian poetry had a short life and fell out of favor by World War I; in contemporary times, "Georgian" can have a pejorative connotation when applied to poetry. Nonetheless, the poets who contributed to the Georgian ideal have mostly carved out individual reputations of high regard. These poets include Rupert Brooke (1887 - 1915), Robert Graves (1895 - 1985), Edmund Blunden (1896 - 1974), Siegfried Sassoon (1886 - 1967), and D.H. Lawrence (1885 - 1930).

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Georgian poetry refers to works composed by a group of male British poets during the reign of King George V, which was 1911–1936. The work was anthologized in a series called Georgian Poetry.

Georgianism is characterized by its embrace of formalism (the adherence to traditional forms), its lyricism, its use of rhyme and metrical regularity, and its focus on the work itself, not external forces that might shape its content and style.

Themes of Georgian poetry tend toward a reverence for nature and rural life. Prominent poets of this group include Abercrombie, Belloc, Blunden, Brooke, Davies, Hodgson, Drinkwater, Flecker, Gibson, Graves, de la Mare, Monro, Squire, Thomas, and Sassoon.

The term Georgian with regard to poetry eventually became pejorative because the work was considered insipid. One of the drivers of this movement was to make poetry accessible to a wider readership, but in doing so, critics felt that the work added little to the Western canon.

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