What is George Nipping's testimony in Monster

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Monster by Walter Dean Myers tells the story of Steve Harmon, a black teenager who is accused of murder with two other people. Steve tells his story as the screenplay of a movie, so much of what is explained is done in dialogue or using film cues.

George Nipping is...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

Monster by Walter Dean Myers tells the story of Steve Harmon, a black teenager who is accused of murder with two other people. Steve tells his story as the screenplay of a movie, so much of what is explained is done in dialogue or using film cues.

George Nipping is a witness brought in by the defense of James King—the other defendant on the stand. George is supposed to provide testimony that will help the case of King. Steve describes Nipping as, “...about 50 and wears wire-rimmed glasses. He speaks precisely and generally makes a good impression.” (page 211). He is considered a good witness by Steve, at least compared to some of the other witnesses that James King brings to the trial.

Nipping’s testimony is that he once bought a left-handed glove for James King when he was a child. The declaration is supposed to prove that James King couldn’t have shot someone with his right hand, but the district attorney quickly establishes that this testimony doesn’t mean much when he asks if Mr. Nipping has ever seen Mr. King shoot a gun—proving that his statement is secondary to the case at hand and not useful for determining if Mr. King shot the victim.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

George Nipping is one of the witnesses for the defense. He is specifically called to defend James King (remember, even though Steve and King are being tried together, their fates will be decided separately of one another and their defense lawyers are working separately too – and sometimes against one another).

During his testimony, George Nipping claims that he once sold King a baseball glove that was for a left-handed person. Steve asks Petrocelli what that testimony is all about and she explains that, since the gunshot wound was on the left side of the body, Briggs is trying to make the defense that it couldn't have been done by the left-handed James King. She adds that it is not a very strong defense. 

Petrocelli cross-examines him and, unsurprisingly, knocks down his argument by saying that, having never seen King shoot a gun, Nipping couldn't know how he would do it. 

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team