What further importance can you infer from the references to color,shape,texture,and the juxtaposition of objects?

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William Carlos Williams was writing within an early twentieth-century literary style called imagism, a reaction to Romantic poetry that focused on creating precise visual images. In striving to accurately represent some subject, the poet would aim to use simple language in order to avoid abstractions and focus on the concrete.

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William Carlos Williams was writing within an early twentieth-century literary style called imagism, a reaction to Romantic poetry that focused on creating precise visual images. In striving to accurately represent some subject, the poet would aim to use simple language in order to avoid abstractions and focus on the concrete.

In this poem, Williams juxtaposes color with the red wheelbarrow beside the white chickens; he juxtaposes shapes in the same way, and he refers to texture when he describes the wheelbarrow as being "glazed" with water. He creates this arresting visual image of a large tool made of metal and wood but shining with wet, next to fluffy, feathery white chickens. These are relatively commonplace items, but by drawing our attention to them in such detail, he makes it clear that they do have more significance than we might, at first, ascribe to them. Their vibrancy seems to indicate that they are important to the farmer's life, as does the idea that "so much depends / upon" them (lines 1-2): his livelihood and his ability to produce food for others certainly depends on his farm animals and crops (for which he, theoretically, uses the wheelbarrow), and we—in a sense—all depend on the farmer for food and sustenance.

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