A Midsummer Night's Dream Questions and Answers
by William Shakespeare

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What are four literary devices used in the play A Midsummer Night's Dream? I need the act, scene, and line number for these.

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In act II, scene i, starting at line 233, Shakespeare uses the literary device of monologue. A monologue is like a soliloquy in being a speech that expresses a character's thoughts. It differs from a soliloquy in that other characters—or a character—are onstage. They hear it being delivered. Oberon has a long monologue in this act, with Puck at his side. This allows Shakespeare, through Oberon, to describe the fairy world.

This monologue employs imagery, which is description using any of the five senses of sight, sound, taste, touch, or smell. Oberon depicts a sensuous natural world:

I know a bank where the wild thyme blows,
Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows,
Quite overcanopied with luscious woodbine,
With sweet musk roses and with eglantine.

We can imagine a lush place full of colorful flowers and sweet smells from Oberon's description. Touch (tactile) imagery emerges in the movement of the thyme blowing in the wind. We note too that Shakespeare is using rhyming couplets in this...

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