The Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe

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What is the foreshadowing in "The Masque of the Red Death"?  

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The narrator foreshadows from the start that this fortress of pleasure will be invaded by the horror of the Red Death.

First, the indifference and callousness of the prince towards the sufferings of his subjects cries out for poetic justice. We learn at the start that the prince thinks:

The external world could take care of itself. In the meantime it was folly to grieve, or to think. The prince had provided all the appliances of pleasure. ... there were musicians, there was Beauty, there was wine. All these and security were within. Without was the "Red Death"

From the beginning, we are uneasily aware that it is impossible to shut out trouble for too long. The prince is trying too hard.

Poe also uses imagery to foreshadow that death is coming. In the final room, the seventh room, which is hung with black, the image of the "blood-tinted" panes and the use of the word "ghastly" foreshadow the grim ending:

the effect of the fire-light that streamed upon the dark hangings through the...

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