The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe

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Does "The Tell-Tale Heart" contain any examples of foreshadowing?

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Poe's mysterious tale of a murderous narrator hinges on foreshadowing to set the tone and keep the mystery moving forward.

In the beginning, the narrator notes, "It is impossible to say how first the idea entered my brain; but once conceived, it haunted me day and night." This unnamed "idea" that the narrator has is vaguely stated but foreshadows some future poor choice, noted in the connotation of the fact that it "haunted" him.

Later, as the old man is sleeping, the narrator says that he "heard a slight groan, and I knew it was the groan of mortal terror." As the narrator has felt his own "powers" building in watching the old man night after night, his plans seem increasingly more evil in his verb choice of "groan" that seems to subconsciously reflect the "mortal terror" of the man's presence in his room.

The madness in the ending is foreshadowed in the following line which the narrator provides before he even kills the old man: "Have I not told you that what you mistake for madness is but...

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