What are the flashbacks in the book The Help?

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If you are looking for a list, here are some examples, for which I have tried to provide some significance:

Aibileen has flashbacks about her deceased son, Treelore, and about raising babies other than Elizabeth Leefolt's. Through these flashbacks, it is illustrated that Aibileen has lived her life raising other...

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If you are looking for a list, here are some examples, for which I have tried to provide some significance:

Aibileen has flashbacks about her deceased son, Treelore, and about raising babies other than Elizabeth Leefolt's. Through these flashbacks, it is illustrated that Aibileen has lived her life raising other people's babies in order to be able to support her own. This is in stark contrast to Elizabeth, her employer, who has the means to stay home with her own babies and raise them herself but chooses to neglect them. This also illustrates that both women, in a sense, were prisoners in their own time. Aibileen had to raise babies because she wanted to raise one of her own, but Elizabeth was forced to have babies even though she did not want them.

Minny has flashbacks about her childhood and taking care of her alcoholic father, a pattern she ended up repeating with her husband (and at one point, she thinks, with Celia Foote). Celia's own memories about growing up poor in Sugarditch make Minny think differently about her own past; she realizes she probably had it a lot better than Celia in some ways.

Skeeter has flashbacks about Constantine, and through these flashbacks and her work with the maids, she is able to gain much more insight into the lives of black women. She realizes, essentially, that Constantine had to compartmentalize her life in the same way Aibileen did.

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One of the most poignant parts of The Help is the story of Treelore, Aibileen's deceased son. Aibileen, a writer of prayers her entire life, was writing for herself; she saw writing talent in Treelore and had hoped it could help him make a better life for himself in spite of being a black growing up in the South of the 1950's. He "even start writing his own book, bout being a colored man living and working in Mississippi." His story is told through a combination of flashbacks of actual experiences and Aibileen's memories, spoken as she talks with Skeeter.

Another use of the flashback technique is found in the eventual revelation of the complete story behind the departure of Constantine. Skeeter goes from being mystified about the unlikely initial explanation to being crushed to learn the true reason for her leaving.

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