what are five points Wiesel is making to us the reader of Night?what are five points Wiesel is making to us the reader of Night?

3 Answers | Add Yours

akannan's profile pic

Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I cannot begin to express how lucid post number 2 is.  There is little I can add.  I would like to suggest, though, that one point that comes out of "Night" is the need to communicate horrific experiences to others.  Part of what makes the work so powerful is that we can sense the level of catharsis that such a writing must have been.  Sometimes, this is not a very pleasurable experience, but in articulating the hellish nature of our most tormented experiences, we are able to take ownership of them and appropriate them.  In asserting control, we are able to find or reclaim our voice.  Victims of sexual assault/ rape are encouraged to do this.  In speaking out, we take control of what was taken from us and in doing so, our voice is somewhat reestablished, as well as some of our dignity.  This might be a lesson being stressed to us through the work.

herappleness's profile pic

M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

You may want to check out Elie Wiesel's Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech. On that speech, he states clearly what he wanted to achieve as far as the novel goes.

First, it is the aspect of humility. The experience in the concentration camp was meant to break and destroy a race, yet, even out of the ashes, what really came out of him was a sense of humility to even be a part of the human race, no matter how flawed it is.

Second,  is the aspect of "never forgetting". When you forget, like Wiesel says "you ARE guilty. You are an accomplice". Hence, bringing every detail was meant to perforate the psyche and schema of every reader, so that we do not forget either.

Third, is understanding the feelings and emotions of pure humanity. From the most depraved reactions from the prisoners going towards camp in the third section all the way to the feelings when seeing the burning ovens, to smelling human flesh, all that naturalism and realism conveys humanism, a very necessary element to really conceptualize the holocaust.

Fourth is change- How he came in a boy and left a saturated, hard, hurt, confused individual- all in the first Night, for the events were appalling.

Fifth is understanding the effects of one mentality in the lives of millions of others. The injustice of the entire situation is not only the results of the holocaust, but the causes. Understanding both the beginnings and ending of this sad period of history will always linger in the heads of people with a conscience. That will make our mentality and that of others shift away from something so senseless again.

sweetheartnumba1's profile pic

sweetheartnumba1 | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

You may want to check out Elie Wiesel's Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech. On that speech, he states clearly what he wanted to achieve as far as the novel goes.

First, it is the aspect of humility. The experience in the concentration camp was meant to break and destroy a race, yet, even out of the ashes, what really came out of him was a sense of humility to even be a part of the human race, no matter how flawed it is.

Second,  is the aspect of "never forgetting". When you forget, like Wiesel says "you ARE guilty. You are an accomplice". Hence, bringing every detail was meant to perforate the psyche and schema of every reader, so that we do not forget either.

Third, is understanding the feelings and emotions of pure humanity. From the most depraved reactions from the prisoners going towards camp in the third section all the way to the feelings when seeing the burning ovens, to smelling human flesh, all that naturalism and realism conveys humanism, a very necessary element to really conceptualize the holocaust.

Fourth is change- How he came in a boy and left a saturated, hard, hurt, confused individual- all in the first Night, for the events were appalling.

Fifth is understanding the effects of one mentality in the lives of millions of others. The injustice of the entire situation is not only the results of the holocaust, but the causes. Understanding both the beginnings and ending of this sad period of history will always linger in the heads of people with a conscience. That will make our mentality and that of others shift away from something so senseless again.

wow thank you so much. you defenatly know how to put words to where they make sense.

We’ve answered 318,957 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question