What are five great or interesting quotes selected from Chapters 12 through 23 of To Kill a Mockingbird?I need to write five dialectical journals for my English class, so I need five quotes,...

What are five great or interesting quotes selected from Chapters 12 through 23 of To Kill a Mockingbird?

I need to write five dialectical journals for my English class, so I need five quotes, preferably not from the same chapter.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Scout's in Love.  Scout and Dill are a couple, at least during the summer months, and she misses her "permanent fiance," who has written to tell her that he will be unable to come to Maycomb this year.

I had never thought about it, but summer was Dill by the whirlpool smoking string... summer was the swiftness with which Dill would reach up and kiss me when Jem was not looking, the longings we sometimes felt each other feel. With him, life was routine; without him, life was unbearable.  (Chapter 12)

Aunt Alexandra.  Scout is always at odds with her aunt after Atticus's sister comes to stay. Alexandra nags Scout about being more ladylike or having more respect for the Finch family heritage, so Scout's description of her may not be entirely kind.

She was not fat, but solid, and she chose protective garments that drew up her bosom to giddy heights, pinched in her waist, flared out her rear and managed to suggest that that Aunt Alexandra's was once an hourglass figure. From any angle, it was formidable.  (Chapter 13)

Dill Returns.  Although Dill was not supposed to spend the summer in Maycomb, he decides to run away from home and his new father, who Dill claims chained him in the basement. Dill appears under Scout's bed, and Atticus works it out so that Dill can spend the night at the Finch house. Scout and Dill spend an innocent night together--in Scout's bed--where he makes an astute observation about Boo Radley. Unlike Dill,

     "Maybe he [Boo] doesn't have anywhere to run off to."  (Chapter 14

Bob Ewell.  Making false accusations against Tom and putting him on trial for murder is not enough for Bob: An insult is also necessary, and Bob sends the courtroom into a frenzy when he states that

"--I seen that black nigger yonder ruttin' on my Mayella!"  (Chapter 17)

Dolphus Raymond.  After Dill becomes sick in the courtroom, he and Scout encounter the "sinful" Mr. Raymond, who reveals his secret about the bottle in the paper sack before telling them about the injustices that black men and women face from Maycomb's white citizens.

     "Cry about the simple hell people give other people--without even thinking. Cry about the hell white people give colored folks, without even stopping to think that they're people, too.  (Chapter 20)

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