Briefly, what are five conflicts that occur from chapters 1 to 15 of Huckleberry Finn?

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Conflicts are a way for characters to make decisions and prove themselves and also a way for the plot to move forward, sometimes unpredictably. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, characters face a string of conflicts, many of which are quickly resolved. In chapters 1–15, five conflicts include:

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Conflicts are a way for characters to make decisions and prove themselves and also a way for the plot to move forward, sometimes unpredictably. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, characters face a string of conflicts, many of which are quickly resolved. In chapters 1–15, five conflicts include:

Huck vs. Religion in chapters 1–2

Huck is living with two spinsters, and although he has money in the bank (thanks to the town judge managing the money he and Tom found in Twain's previous story, Tom Sawyer), is getting an education, and is wearing good clothes, he chafes at it. He especially hates religion and sees no use in prayers. All of these things represent civilization, but it's fair to say Huck has an especially low regard for religion as something useless and impractical.

Huck vs. Himself in chapters 3–4

He is beginning to get used to schooling and get into the rhythm of his new life, but Huck still feels the pull of the past and has feelings of concern over whether his father will show up again. He isn't completely sure where he fits in due to all the changes to his daily life. His self-doubt portends a dark and difficult next few chapters.

Huck vs. Childhood in chapters 4–7 & Huck vs Pap in chapters 4–7

Huck's father reappears in the story, despite rumors that he is dead. He is a mean and controlling man, and Huck has mixed feelings about him. He dislikes him, but Pap is his only family. The conflict with Pap continues as Huck learns that Pap mainly wants his money, then Pap essentially holds Huck hostage in his cabin. Huck escapes by pointing a gun at his father and leaving by raft. He narrowly misses his Pap, who is out looking for him in the darkness while they are both on the river. In these chapters, Huck must fight his father, and the conflict is obvious. Huck is also in conflict with his past and childhood, as he steps up to confront the abuse and decides to leave. He tries to make it appear that his Pap is dead, so others will think that Huck no longer has a father to command him.

Huck vs Jim in chapter 15

In chapter 15, Jim and Huck are traveling down the river looking for the city of Cairo. A fog descends upon them. This separates them (which could be interpreted as conflict with nature), and in the confusion Huck plays a trick on Jim. Like the first trick in chapter 10, when Huck put a dead snake on the sleeping Jim which proved to be alive and bit him—it backfires. This time, Jim becomes angry and Huck feels ashamed of what he's done. He realizes how much he likes Jim and how much he needs him. This is an important conflict because Huck begins to show more maturity. It's their first real argument and is a conflict that marks a turning point in their relationship.

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Like most novels, Huck Finn has conflicts that don't just occur in one spot in the book.  Instead, the same conflict, such as Huck vs. society, shows up over and over throughout during different circumstances.  That being said, here are some conflicts that show up in the first 15 chapters:

Huck vs. the Widow and Miss Watson about being civilized - these two women try to teach Huck manners, religion, and academics as befitting their society, but Huck for the most part is not interested at all.  

Huck vs. Pap - Huck's father shows up on the scene and berates and abuses him for going to school and getting an education.  He also tries to get Huck's money from him. He also kidnaps Huck and abuses him until Huck makes his creative getaway

Pap vs. society - Pap is the town drunk who wants to blame everyone else for his problems.  When given the opportunity to turn his life around, he rejects it and goes and gets drunk again. 

Huck vs. Jim - Several incidents take place between Huck in Jim where Huck struggles because he begins to see Jim as a human being, but he has been taught his whole life that Jim is a slave and therefore not human.  This struggle continues throughout the novel.

Huck vs. his conscience - Huck struggles with whether or not to help Jim.  He feels its wrong to turn him in, but feels its wrong to help him.  This conflict also continues throughout the novel.

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