What does Fitzgerald try to emphasize at the end of chapter 7?

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Chapter 7 represents the climax of The Great Gatsby, that part in the story with the greatest emotional drama and intensity. The denouement is yet to arrive, but the events of this chapter decisively point towards it. What Fitzgerald wants to emphasize in this chapter is Gatsby 's loneliness....

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Chapter 7 represents the climax of The Great Gatsby, that part in the story with the greatest emotional drama and intensity. The denouement is yet to arrive, but the events of this chapter decisively point towards it. What Fitzgerald wants to emphasize in this chapter is Gatsby's loneliness. He was always lonely, to be sure, never really being able to connect with the East Egg crowd despite his best efforts. But now that Daisy's gone back to Tom, he stands completely isolated, the details of his sordid past revealed.

So long as Gatsby believed he was in with a chance of being with Daisy, he could assuage his chronic sense of loneliness. But no longer. The dream has died, and something of Gatsby has died with it. In chapter 7, then, in addition to loneliness, there is foreshadowing of Gatsby's death.

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As chapter seven closes, the reader recognizes a series of ends. Myrtle Wilson's life has violently ended, and with it, her dream of escaping the Valley of Ashes. With Daisy back in the Buchanans' home, deep in conversation with Tom, it seems her relationship with Gatsby will end. Nick's disgust with Jordan's callousness in the wake of Myrtle's death suggests that their relationship is winding down. Nick notes that it is September, the end of the summer. And Nick's final observation of Gatsby at chapter's end is that he stood outside Daisy's house, "watching over nothing." If we look back to chapter one where Nick tells us that he returned to the Midwest from the East in the autumn, we realize that Nick's time in New York is also coming to an end.

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