What are the first two things Alexandra says when she comes to the Finch house? Are these typical for her or not?

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In chapter 13, Aunt Alexandra moves into the Finch household so she can teach Scout how to behave like a proper lady and watch the children while Atticus works on his upcoming case. Scout mentions that the first things Aunt Alexandra says are,

Put my bag in the front...

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In chapter 13, Aunt Alexandra moves into the Finch household so she can teach Scout how to behave like a proper lady and watch the children while Atticus works on his upcoming case. Scout mentions that the first things Aunt Alexandra says are,

Put my bag in the front bedroom, Calpurnia . . . Jean Louise, stop scratching your head" (Lee, 128).

These two commands are typical of Aunt Alexandra. Alexandra is an authoritative women, who is used to giving commands and being obeyed. Callously addressing Calpurnia to take her bags indicates how Aunt Alexandra views black women. Like many citizens of Maycomb, Scout's aunt is prejudiced towards black people and views them as second-class citizens. Alexandra is also the epitome of a Southern belle and is continually criticizing Scout for her tomboy personality, which is why she feels it necessary to correct Scout for scratching her head. Throughout the novel, Aunt Alexandra and Scout do not get along because Alexandra is constantly commenting on Scout's lifestyle. Alexandra is very insensitive, which is evident by the first two comments she says when she arrives at the Finch household. 

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When Aunt Alexandra arrived at the Finch house unexpectedly, she said two things:

"Put my bag in the front bedroom, Calpurnia," was the first thing Aunt Alexandra said.  "Jean Louise, stop scratching your head," was the second thing she said (To Kill a Mockingbird, Chapter 13).

The first thing Aunt Alexandra said was unusual.  Jem and Scout were surprised when Aunt Alexandra showed up at their house one afternoon after church.  Atticus was out of town and had not mentioned a word of her visit to them.  It was unusual for Aunt Alexandra to come to the house with a heavy suitcase.  She rarely came to visit them at all.  Scout was puzzled.  She asked if Uncle Jimmy, Aunt Alexandra's husband, was also coming to stay.  She found out that he was not.

The second thing Aunt Alexandra said was typical.  She frequently corrected Scout on her manners.  She called Scout Jean Louise and she frequently implored her to be more ladylike.  Scout preferred to play outside with Dill and Jem, but she did try to please her aunt.

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When Aunt Alexandra arrives at the Finch house at the beginning of chapter 13, she says, “Put my bag in the front bedroom, Calpurnia." Then she says, “Jean Louise, stop scratching your head."

These comments are typical of Aunt Alexandra. She is an entitled person who insists on a rigid social order. She is old-fashioned and bigoted in her morals, and she treats African Americans, such as Calpurnia, as second-class citizens. Therefore, Aunt Alexandra does not believe in the egalitarian treatment of Calpurnia, whom Atticus treats with respect. 

In addition, she believes in rigid gender roles, and she thinks Scout should play with tea sets and wear the pearl necklaces she gave her niece when she was born. Scout's insistence on being herself and acting like a tomboy irritates Aunt Alexandra, who often lectures Atticus on the subject. 

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Aunt Alexanra tells Calpurnia to put her bag in the house and tells Scout to stop scratching her head.

When Aunt Alexandra shows up at the Finch house unexpectedly, she does not greet the children or Calpurnia.  She immediately behaves as if she owns the place and starts ordering everyone around.

“Put my bag in the front bedroom, Calpurnia,” was the first thing Aunt Alexandra said. “Jean Louise, stop scratching your head,” was the second thing she said. (Ch. 13)

This behavior is typical of Alexandra.  She and Scout do not have a loving relationship.  Scout sees her as cold and bossy.  The incident at Christmas confirms this, because Scout found out that Alexandra said terrible things about Atticus defending Tom Robinson.  Scout was also highly annoyed by her cousin Frances, who was a chip of Alexandra’s block.

Atticus tells Scout that Aunt Alexandra does not understand girls much, because she had no daughters.  This means that she tends to want to interfere with Scout’s life and try to show her how to be a lady.

Aunt Alexandra was fanatical on the subject of my attire. I could not possibly hope to be a lady if I wore breeches; when I said I could do nothing in a dress, she said I wasn’t supposed to be doing things that required pants. (Ch. 9)

Scout is not thrilled to see Alexandra on her porch.  When she finds out her aunt is staying to support her brother during the trial, she is even less happy about it.  She knows the two of them will never get along.

The relationship between Scout and Alexandra is a rocky one.  Alexandra represents all of the old ways that Atticus has carefully avoided in raising his children. She believes the Finches are better than anyone else because of how long they have lived in Maycomb, while Atticus tried to teach his children to value people for who they were. Yet in her own way, Alexandra is just trying to help Scout by making sure that she is raised the right way.

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    Aunt Alexandra invites herself to come to Maycomb and take care of Jem and Scout while Atticus prepares for the Tom Robinson trial in Harper Lee's novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Atticus fails in his attempts to convince his sister to stay at Finch's Landing and that Calpurnia is capable of taking care of them all. As Jem, Scout and Calpurnia return from a Sunday at the First Purchase A.M.E. Church, Jem cries out to look at "the porch yonder." Thinking he means the Radley porch, Scout half expects to finally see Boo there. But, he means their own porch, where Aunt Alexandra sits rocking "as if she had sat there every day of her life."

    "Put my bag in the front room, Calpurnia," was the first thing Aunt Alexandra said. "Jean Louise, stop scratching your head" was the second thing she said.

    Neither of these remarks should come as a surprise, since Alexandra's bossiness is a lifelong habit. She later makes it clear that Calpurnia is no longer needed in the household now that she has arrived. Additionally, Aunt Alexandra always seems to make a comment about Scout's unladylike ways.

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